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DSD….The Queen Accepts Brown’s step down…..

The Queen has accepted Gordon Brown’s tendered resignation as Prime Minister.

Brown is saying goodbye to staff and campaign workers at the HQ of the Labour Party, whose leadership he also resigned with immediate effect. A leadership election process will begin, but will take some time. Presumably the acting Leader of H.M. Official Opposition in Parliament will be Harriet Harman, Labour’s Deputy Leader who has said she would not seek to be permanent Leader.

David Cameron will head to Buckingham Palace shortly to become the youngest Prime Minister, at age 43, since Lord Liverpool in 1812 (during the Napoleonic Wars and the start of a war with the U.S.)

Britain Gets a New Boss

[ The new British Prime Minister David Cameron and his wife …..at 10 Downing Street….. their new Home….]

The Atlantic Link here………….….

Update on the Time line ……

Posts from BBC Election Live (by Justin Parkinson)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/election2010/liveevent/

Times, in 24-hour format (e.g. 0001), are British Summer Time (BST) which is 5 hours ahead of Eastern Daylight (EDT) and 8 ahead of Pacific Daylight (PDT) (e.g. 1901 = 7 p.m. and 1601 = 4 p.m.)

0001: Prime Minister David Cameron and his deputy Nick Clegg are due to outline the full details of the coalition government later, as it begins its first complete day in office.
2356: More on the details of the coalition deal. The Lib Dems agreed to an emergency budget within 50 days and to Tory a budget reduction plan including £6bn in cuts to non-frontline services in 2010/11. The two sides also agreed a commitment to a replacement for the Trident nuclear missile system but the programme will be scrutinised for value for money.
2347: Labour’s Ed Miliband tweets: We owe Gordon a huge debt: Britain is a fairer country and our world is more just because of what he did. Today he showed grace and dignity. Read Ed Miliband’s tweets
2340: The first full meeting of the coalition cabinet is expected to take place on Wednesday.
2337: Andrew, Newcastle-under-Lyme, writes: Why is the idea of coalition such a surprise to all commentators? In last Thursday’s local election, about a quarter of local councils elected had no overall control. Here in Newcastle, we’ve had a joint Tory-Lib Dem administration and the audit commission says it’s been the most improved council in the country for two years running. Have Your Say
2336: Lib Dem Danny Alexander is to become Scottish secretary, the BBC learns. The Lib Dems are expected to get about 20 government jobs in total.
2332: The Lib Dems have agreed to a cap on immigration and a commitment not to join the euro for the lifetime of the parliament.
2323: Details of the Tory-Lib Dem deal emerge. The Lib Dems have agreed to drop plans for a “mansion tax”, while the Conservatives have ditched their pledge to raise the inheritance tax threshold to £1m. The new administration will scrap Labour’s planned rise in National Insurance but some of the benefits will go to reducing income tax thresholds for lower earners.
2317: Conservative Andrew Lansley will become health secretary, the BBC learns. There is still no confirmation of who will be home secretary.
Brown resigned when it became clear today that a coalition with the Liberal Democrats was not possible.

Although Cameron will become PM, it’s not clear what sort of government he will lead. It’s still theoretically possible that it will be a minority Conservative ministry. The Conservative negotiators are reporting to David Cameron, while the Liberal Democratic MPs’ caucus will meet shortly to hear and consider what their negotiators have to report.

Update #2

Nick Clegg (Lib Dem leader) will be Deputy PM.

Liam Fox (C) will be HM Secretary for Defence.

The outlines of the agreement on fiscal matters is becoming clearer (more later, maybe). There will apparently also be a fixed term of five years (i.e. no snap election).

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May 11, 2010 - Posted by | Blogs, Breaking News, DSD @PoliticalDog101, Government, Media, Men, Other Things, Politics, Updates | , ,

26 Comments »

  1. The Queen has accepted Gordon Brown’s tendered resignation as Prime Minister.
    ———————-

    It is dangerous that the Earth’s BIGGEST landowner has this much power and dislikes Israel

    Comment by Timothy Leal | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  2. David Cameron is leaving Buckingham Palace and approaching No. 10 Downing Street, outside which he will speak shortly. The Palace released a photograph of David Cameron accepting the Queen’s appointment as her Prime Minister.

    Addressing party workers at Labour HQ, Gordon Brown accepted sole responsibility for the party’s election loss.

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  3. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by James Finley. James Finley said: DSD….The Queen Accepts Brown's step down…..: http://wp.me/pAL4p-2NA […]

    Pingback by Tweets that mention DSD….The Queen Accepts Brown’s step down….. « PoliticalDog101.com -- Topsy.com | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  4. At 10 Downing Street, David Cameron says his aim is a “full and proper coalition” with the Liberal Democrats. The new Chancellor of the Exchequer (= finance minister or sec. of the treasury) will be George Osborne (C).

    The Liberal Democratic MP’s are meeting now to hear what the proposed common programme of government will be.

    The Tories are holding a similar meeting.

    President Barack Obama has apparently made the first telephone call of a foreign leader to David Cameron as Prime Minister.

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  5. The Liberal Democratic leader, Nick Clegg, reports the BBC, will be Deputy Prime Minister, and four other Liberal Democrats will serve in Cabinet. However, we don’t know whom or in what posts.

    William Hague, a former leader of the Conservative Party, will be Foreign Secretary; George Osborne (C.) will be Chancellor of the Exchequer.

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  6. Nick Clegg (Lib Dem leader) will be Deputy PM.

    Liam Fox (C) will be HM Secretary for Defence.

    The outlines of the agreement on fiscal matters is becoming clearer (more later, maybe). There will apparently also be a fixed term of five years (i.e. no snap election).

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  7. Sheffield City Council’s boss has given up his £20,000 returning officer fee after long queues stopped people voting at the general election.
    Police were called to sit-in protests at three polling stations in the city after hundreds were unable to vote.
    The council’s chief executive, John Mothersole, who was responsible for voting, apologised and admitted the council had “got things wrong”.
    The Electoral Commission is carrying out a review into what happened.

    More at:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/south_yorkshire/8674891.stm

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  8. Posts from BBC Election Live (by Justin Parkinson)

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/election2010/liveevent/

    Times, in 24-hour format (e.g. 0001), are British Summer Time (BST) which is 5 hours ahead of Eastern Daylight (EDT) and 8 ahead of Pacific Daylight (PDT) (e.g. 1901 = 7 p.m. and 1601 = 4 p.m.)

    0001: Prime Minister David Cameron and his deputy Nick Clegg are due to outline the full details of the coalition government later, as it begins its first complete day in office.
    2356: More on the details of the coalition deal. The Lib Dems agreed to an emergency budget within 50 days and to Tory a budget reduction plan including £6bn in cuts to non-frontline services in 2010/11. The two sides also agreed a commitment to a replacement for the Trident nuclear missile system but the programme will be scrutinised for value for money.
    2347: Labour’s Ed Miliband tweets: We owe Gordon a huge debt: Britain is a fairer country and our world is more just because of what he did. Today he showed grace and dignity. Read Ed Miliband’s tweets
    2340: The first full meeting of the coalition cabinet is expected to take place on Wednesday.
    2337: Andrew, Newcastle-under-Lyme, writes: Why is the idea of coalition such a surprise to all commentators? In last Thursday’s local election, about a quarter of local councils elected had no overall control. Here in Newcastle, we’ve had a joint Tory-Lib Dem administration and the audit commission says it’s been the most improved council in the country for two years running. Have Your Say
    2336: Lib Dem Danny Alexander is to become Scottish secretary, the BBC learns. The Lib Dems are expected to get about 20 government jobs in total.
    2332: The Lib Dems have agreed to a cap on immigration and a commitment not to join the euro for the lifetime of the parliament.
    2323: Details of the Tory-Lib Dem deal emerge. The Lib Dems have agreed to drop plans for a “mansion tax”, while the Conservatives have ditched their pledge to raise the inheritance tax threshold to £1m. The new administration will scrap Labour’s planned rise in National Insurance but some of the benefits will go to reducing income tax thresholds for lower earners.
    2317: Conservative Andrew Lansley will become health secretary, the BBC learns. There is still no confirmation of who will be home secretary.

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  9. From this much-longer BBC story:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/election_2010/8675265.stm

    Following hours of talks with the Conservatives on Tuesday, the Lib Dem parliamentary party and its federal executive endorsed the coalition agreement by the required three-quarters majority at a meeting that broke up just after midnight.

    Speaking minutes later, Mr Clegg said: “I hope this is the start of the new politics I have always believed in – diverse, plural, where politicians of different persuasions come together, overcome their differences in order to deliver good government for the sake of the whole country.”

    He acknowledged there would be problems and “glitches” and, in a message to Lib Dem voters, he added: “I can imagine this evening you’ll be having many questions, maybe many doubts, about this new governing arrangement.

    “But I want to assure you that I wouldn’t have entered into this agreement unless I was genuinely convinced that it offers a unique opportunity to deliver the kind of changes you and I believe in.

    “So I hope you’ll keep faith with us, I hope you will let us prove to you that we can serve you and this country with humility, with fairness at the heart of everything we do, and with total dedication to the interests and livelihoods of everyone in Great Britain.”

    ¶ Meanwhile, details are emerging from Conservative sources about the new government’s programme, including:
    *Plans for five-year, fixed-term parliaments
    *The Lib Dems have agreed to drop plans for a “mansion tax”, while the Conservatives have ditched their pledge to raise the inheritance tax threshold to £1m
    *The new administration will scrap Labour’s planned rise in National Insurance but some of the benefits will go on reducing income tax thresholds for lower earners
    *A pledge to have a referendum on any further transfer of powers to the EU and a commitment from the Lib Dems not to adopt the euro for the lifetime of the next Parliament
    *The Lib Dems have agreed to Tory proposals for a cap on non-EU migration
    *The Conservatives will recognise marriage in the tax system – Lib Dems will abstain in Commons vote
    *The Lib Dems will drop opposition to replacement for Britain’s Trident nuclear missiles but the programme will be scrutinised for value for money
    *There will be a “significant acceleration” of efforts to reduce the budget deficit – including £6bn of spending reductions this year
    *There will be a referendum on moving to the Alternative Vote system and enhanced “pupil premium” for deprived children as Lib Dems demanded

    ¶ Mr Cameron has begun the work of appointing his first cabinet, with the Tories’ George Osborne as chancellor, William Hague as foreign secretary and Liam Fox as defence secretary.

    Mr Clegg’s chief of staff, Danny Alexander, who was part of the party’s negotiating team, is to be Scottish Secretary, the BBC understands.

    Lib Dem Treasury spokesman Vince Cable has been given responsibility for “business and banks” but it is not known if his title will be chief secretary to the Treasury, a senior Lib Dem source said.

    A Downing Street spokesman said it had been agreed that five cabinet posts would be filled by Liberal Democrats, including the appointment of Mr Clegg, although there are expected to be about 20 Lib Dems in government jobs in total.

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  10. Damn good job DSD!

    Cap Non- EU migration?

    Is that like immigration?

    Comment by jamesb101 | May 12, 2010 | Reply

    • Migration within the EU is governed by European treaties and is essentially free between EU members (with special provisions for refugees, asylum-seekers, illegal entrants, etc., who were not born within or citizens of an EU country).

      Non-EU migration means immigration from outside the European Union, most notably or notoriously the [British] Commonwealth, from which migration was essentially unimpeded before the 1950’s.

      Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply

      • I kinda figured that……

        Comment by jamesb101 | May 12, 2010

    • Apparently, Britain’s income tax has no separate column for Married and Single taxpayers. David Cameron has suggested an American-style lower rate for couples to promote the Tory value of promoting families.

      National Insurance is the equivalent of Social Security and Medicare deductions on U.S. paychecks.

      Alternative Vote (equivalent to Curt Gans’ proposed “virtual runoff” and similar to the system used in Australian elections) is a system by which voters indicate their preferences between candidates, usually for a single office or within a single single-member district (constituency). Second or third preferences on ballots cast for unsuccessful candidates are added to first-preference votes until one candidate achieves more than 50% of the ballots cast. This is usually less proportional in overall effect than Single Transferable Vote or the “Hare system”, which is the system used in Ireland (for most offices in the Republic, for the Northern Ireland Assembly and for Northern Irish members of the European Parliament).

      Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply

  11. What Nick Clegg told the Liberal Democrats after their parliamentary party and federal executive had each approved the coalition with the Conservatives by more than the necessary supermajorities of 75%. A special LD party conference in Birmingham on Saturday will consider the deal, but it’s highly unlikely that it would reject the agreement or send it to a membership referendum.

    From (again) the BBC:

    Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg hails new government

    Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg has said he hopes his party’s coalition with the Conservatives will herald a “new kind of government”.

    He said he would not have agreed to the deal unless convinced it could deliver the changes Lib Dem supporters want.

    Five Lib Dems will be in the cabinet, including Mr Clegg as deputy prime minister, and there are expected to be about 20 in government posts in total.

    Mr Clegg said the coalition had been “overwhelmingly” endorsed by the party.

    Lib Dem MPs and the party’s federal executive discussed the
    agreement at a meeting that concluded just after midnight.

    ‘Immense challenges’

    Mr Clegg said: “We are now going to form a new government. More importantly we are going to get a new kind of government. I hope that this is the start of the new politics I always believed in.

    “We are politicians, clearly, of different political parties, but I believe we are now united in wishing to tackle the immense challenges this country faces and deliver a fairer, better Britain.”

    He acknowledged some Lib Dem voters may be unhappy at the deal with the Conservatives, who saw party leader David Cameron installed as prime minister on Tuesday following Gordon Brown’s resignation.

    “I am acutely aware that I carry your hopes and your aspirations with me into this coalition agreement,” Mr Clegg said.

    “I can imagine this evening you will be having many questions, maybe many doubts, about this new governing arrangement.

    “But I want to assure you that I wouldn’t have entered into this agreement unless I was genuinely convinced that it offers a unique opportunity to deliver the kind of changes you and I believe in.

    “So I hope you will keep faith with us, I hope you will now let us prove to you that we can serve you and this country with humility, with fairness at the heart of everything we do and with total dedication to the interests and livelihoods of everyone in Great Britain.”

    Mr Clegg praised former prime minister Gordon Brown for his “immense dignity, grace and profound sense of his public duty” in the past few days, describing him as a “towering figure” in British politics.

    A Lib Dem party spokesman said both the parliamentary party and the federal executive had approved the coalition deal by the three-quarters majority required.

    After the meeting, David Laws MP, who was part of the Lib Dems’ negotiating team, said the agreement with the Conservatives had “a lot of Liberal Democrat policies in it”.

    “We’re in politics to try to change things for the better and I think that people will see when the agreement is published that is exactly what it does and it delivers on many of the manifesto agreements that we have been campaigning on in the last few weeks,” he said.

    “This is not just a package of constitutional geekery that means something to politicians in Westminster, but this is a package that will do a great deal for the country.”

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply

    • Correct that: I think, although I’m not certain, those are Nick Clegg’s comments as the MP’s and federal executive were about to begin deliberations, rather than after they’d concluded.

      Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply

      • Correct my correction (?): Maybe they were post-decision remarks, or maybe it’s a mix of comments before and after; it’s unclear.

        For video of Nick Clegg’s full remarks after the decision, go to:

        http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/election_2010/8676549.stm

        ¶ According to one participant’s remark as the Lib Dem parliamentarians and executive were leaving their meetings, the Parliamentary Liberal Democratic Party approved the deal unanimously, while only a single member of the federal executive voted against it. Much more than the 75% needed to make the decision wait for a party assembly or referendum.

        (It’s called a federal executive because it’s a federation of the Scottish, Welsh and English Liberal Democratic parties. Before amalgamation with the Social Democratic Party, the Liberal Party organization outside parliament used to be called the National Liberal Federation.)

        Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010

  12. He’s their Obama..except he’s white……..

    Comment by jamesb101 | May 12, 2010 | Reply

    • Who? Clegg or Cameron? (Or maybe Gordon Brown?)

      Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply

      • clegg…..

        Comment by jamesb101 | May 12, 2010

  13. I wish him good luck…he’s gonna need it!

    Comment by jamesb101 | May 12, 2010 | Reply

  14. I’m out…

    Comment by jamesb101 | May 12, 2010 | Reply

  15. Five-year fixed terms (Quinquennial parliaments) seems like a bad idea to me, not because of the elements but because of the combination.

    France used to have 7-year Presidential terms, now reduced to 5, but the National Assembly is elected more frequently. Mexico has and the Confederacy had 6-year Presidential terms without the ability to be reelected.

    But five years without renewing either the executive or the legislature, regardless of votes of confidence, seems a bit long.

    ¶ The past election seems to fit within the rough alternating cycle of the past century:

    1905-1922 (17 yrs) Liberal-led ministries or coalitions*
    1922-1931 (10 yrs) Transition: Tory and Lab-Lib*
    1931-1945 (14 yrs) Conservative or National led coalitions
    1945-1951 (_6 yrs) Labour governments under Attlee
    1951-1964 (13 yrs) “Thirteen years of Tory misrule”
    1964-1979 (15 yrs) Labour interrupted by 4 Tory years
    1979-1997 (17 yrs) Conservative governments (Thatcher-Major)
    1997-2010 (13 yrs) Labour governments (Blair-Brown)

    *Alternatively:
    1918-1929 (11 yrs) Conservative-dominated ministries or coalitions, interrupted by Lab-Lib in 1924

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply

  16. Coalition Government: Now for the hard part…

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/election_2010/8676216.stm

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply

    • DSD…it’s gonna be real hard for them to pull this off…..

      Comment by jamesb101 | May 12, 2010 | Reply

  17. The full text of David Cameron’s first remarks outside No. 10 Downing Street, after accepting the Queen’s invitation to try and form a new government acceptable to a majority of the House of Commons:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/election_2010/8676405.stm

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply

  18. Cameron welcomed Nick Clegg on the steps of 10 Downing Street and shook his hand.

    Much more should be manifest when the two hold a press conference at 2:15 p.m. BST = 9:15 a.m. EDT = 6:15 a.m. PDT.

    A minor detail, but huge in terms of British constitutional history, would be a House of Lords elected by proportional representation (rather than appointed by the Prime Minister or succeeding through inheriting a peerage).

    The Home Office (justice, prisons, police, immigration and other interior-ministry type functions) still hasn’t been filled.

    Other cabinet posts so far:

    Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury: David Cameron (C)
    Deputy Prime Minister: Nick Clegg (LD)

    Foreign and Commonwealth Office: William Hague, former Tory leader
    Defence: Liam Fox (C)
    Chancellor of the Exchequer: George Osborne (C)
    Chief Secretary to the Treasury: ???
    Overseeing banking and business: Vincent Cable (LD)
    Home Secretary: ???

    Scotland: Danny Alexander (LD)
    Health: Andrew Lansley (C)
    Environment and climate change: Chris Huhne (LD)

    ¶ A blog reported that the Labour Party’s web site crashed because of a flood of new membership applications. Alistair Campbell, a former Labour spin doctor, says that the reality is that Nick Clegg has drawn his party to the right and an “extraordinary” number of disappointed Liberal Democrats have been calling Labour Party offices seeking to join.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/election2010/liveevent/

    Comment by Democratic Socialist Dave | May 12, 2010 | Reply


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