Jamesb101.com

commentary on Politics and a little bit of everything else

The US Air Force orders more C-27J small transport planes…..

At least they are going ahead with the program…

I still think the Army should flying the things like the orignal plan…

But that’s another slight from Gates……..

Anyways…..

Congress has authorized the money so the Air Force has placed the order for more planes

Alenia North America, a unit of Italy’s Finmeccanica, has received a $319 million order from the U.S. Air Force for eight C-27J tactical transport aircraft, bringing to 21 to total number now ordered by the U.S. Air Force and Army.

The aircraft will be delivered during 2012 to L-3, Finmeccanica’s partner on the program, Finmeccanica said in a statement. The 21 aircraft now ordered by the U.S. are worth $812 million, the firm added.

More…..

Update…..

The Dog has done some research …….

Interesting…..

When the Army gave up the C-27J…….They made a deal…..

The deal was the Air Force gets the aircraft…..

BUT…..

Dig this…..

The Air Force Operational Unit will be assigned and subordinate to the Army!

In another words…..

The Unit is Air Force drivers and staff…..

But their Operational bosses are ARMY…..

From the US Army

What continued efforts does Army Aviation have planned for the future?

The future of the C-27J is to rapidly field and deploy the aircraft and its crews as they become available for deployment. The limiting factor for the next few years will be class throughput for training both pilots and loadmasters and the production of new aircraft. The Army Chief of Staff has directed that all roles and missions dealing with the movement of cargo via fixed-wing aircraft be handled by the Air Force, therefore a plan is being developed to limit or divest the remaining cargo carrying capability of Army fixed-wing aviation. The Air Force is on board to support the Army so no future gap exists by utilizing a “Platform Neutral” concept. In layman term’s, they will support the Army with whatever asset they deem appropriate, i.e., C-130, C-27J, etc., in the previously mentioned CAB structure.

Why is this important to the Army and Army Aviation?

By transferring the C-27J from the Army and Army Aviation and developing a plan to limit and/or divest the remaining cargo assets, the Army can save money in both procurement and operating costs that can go to other programs deemed in-line with Army roles and missions. Army Aviation has the opportunity to employ true joint operations with the embedding of the Air Force C-27J unit into an Army Aviation unit. This will be a continual relationship and foster a cohesive support mechanism to the ground commander, utilizing all available aviation assets to “get the job done.” As events have shown, the ability to move what needs to be moved, where it needs to be, in a timely manner, are essential. It doesn’t matter if we are talking about war, natural disasters, humanitarian relief or homeland security. An integrated aviation lift capability will go a long way in providing the necessary tools to the commander, Army Aviation, and the United States Army.

Update #2…..Where ya going put the C-27J’s?……And are there going to be more?……Will the Coast Guard get some?

Do they go oversea’s WHERE THE ARMY ORIGNALLY SAID THEY NEEDED THEM?

Debate regarding addition of the Joint Cargo Aircraft (JCA) to the military’s inventory has spanned numerous years, and the program has endured many revisions. Envisioned as a short-haul asset designed to deliver supplies the “last tactical mile,” the JCA morphed from a joint aircraft into an Air Force–only platform that will reside solely in the Air National Guard (ANG) as the C-27J..1 Its assignment to ANG units makes it a dual-role aircraft, used to support civil authorities in domestic crises in addition to fulfilling its combat role.

The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84, 28 October 2009) included funding for the Air Force to purchase the first eight of a proposed 38 C-27J aircraft for the ANG..2 Despite debate about the “correct” total number of C-27Js to procure after this modest start, a larger issue remains: where will we base these aircraft, and how will the C-27J support its nascent homeland security mission?

Congress has weighed in on these issues with questions regarding beddowns and funding but has given only passing recognition of the C-27J’s potential homeland security role. In separate reports to be attached to their versions of the FY 10 National Defense Authorization Act, both the House Armed Services Committee (HASC) and the Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) directed the National Guard and Air Force to report on a C-27J basing plan within 120 days of the act’s passage. The HASC’s report contained concerns about the 12 C-27J beddowns previously earmarked for the Army National Guard and urged the Air Force to consider those locations for future C-27J basing. Language in the SASC report left the door open for additional C-27J purchases, referring to the currently budgeted number of 38 aircraft as a “floor” rather than a “ceiling.” The SASC report also notes that any study regarding intratheater airlift must also give “due consideration” to the contribution of these systems to the homeland security mission.3 Concerns remain about whether 38 C-27Js represent a sufficient number for performing missions proposed for the aircraft.4 In a letter of 11 June 2009 to the chairmen and ranking members of both the HASC and SASC, the Adjutants General Association supported “fully funding 78 aircraft for the JCA program,” stating that doing so would “provide a critical capability to state emergency management and homeland security missions.”5 Regardless of the correct number of C-27Js, the aircraft seem destined to play a role in the burgeoning partnership between the Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

More….

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June 9, 2010 - Posted by | Aircraft, Blogs, Breaking News, Counterpoints, Government, Military, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Projections, Travel, Updates | , , ,

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