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Daniel….Polling Summary for Friday, 30th April, 2010

Hello Folks!

Here is our Polling Summary for Friday:

Illinois Senate: Kirk (R)  46 % – Giannoulias (D)  38 % (Rasmussen)

Illinois Governor: Brady (R)  45 % – Quinn (D)  38 % (Rasmussen)
Delaware Senate: Castle (R)  55 % – Coons (D)  32 % (Rasmussen)

New York Governor:  Cuomo (D)  56 % – Lazio (R)  24 % (Rasmussen)

Cuomo (D)  50 % – Levy (R)  27 % (Rasmussen)
Cuomo (D)  55 % – Paladino (R)  25 (Rasmussen)

New Hampshire Senate: Ayotte (R)  47 % – Hodes (D)  32 (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)

Lamontagne (R)  37 % – Hodes (D)  36 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)
Binnie (R)  38 % – Hodes (D)  36 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)
Hodes (D)  37 % – Bender (R)  34 % (WMUR/ University of New Hampshire)

New Hampshire 1st:  Guinta (R)  42 % – Shea-Porter (D)  38 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)

Mahoney (R)  40 % – Shea-Porter (D)  37 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)
Ashoo (R)  39 % – Shea-Porter (D)  36 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)
Bestani (R)  38 % – Shea-Porter (D)  37 % (WMUR/ University of New Hampshire)

New Hampshire 2nd: Bass (R)  44 % – Swett (D)  27 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)

Bass (R)  42 % – McLane-Kuster (D)  30 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)
Horn (R)  35 % – Swett (D)  31 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)
Horn (R)  33 % – McLane-Kuster (D)  32 % (WMUR/University of New Hampshire)

Utah Governor: Herbert (R)  61 % – Coroon (D)  30 % (Mason-Dixon)

Pennsylvania – 12: Burns (R)  46 % – Critz (D)  40 % (DailyKos/Research 2000)

On Monday I’ll have two Summaries: One in the morning and one in the afternoon.

Daniel G.

Thank you Daniel!

Dem’s are behind a bit right now, huh?….

The Dog

More Polls……

OH-SEN Dem Primary

Suffolk University

Fisher 55
Brunner 27

http://www.suffolk.edu/41762.html

http://www.suffolk.edu/images/content/FINAL.Marginals.April.29..pdf


Arizona Governor GOP Primary (PPP)

Brewer 38
Mills 19
Martin 16
Munger 3

http://www.publicpolicypolling.com/pdf/PPP_Release_AZ_430.pdf

April 30, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Daniel G @ PolitcalDog, Government, Media, Men, Other Things, Politics, Polls, Updates, Women | , , | 8 Comments

Daylight Savings Time…..This Sunday Morning Folks…..

Daylight Saving Time – 2010

In the US and Canada
Daylight Saving Time always begins on the second Sunday of March and ends on the first Sunday of November.

This means that, on March 14, 2010, at 2:00 a.m. – you set the clocks ahead one hour. (Spring forward)

And on Sunday, November 7, 2010, at 2:00 a.m. – you set the clocks back an hour. (Fall back)

Click on the Related Link below for more information on DST times around the world.

From Wiki Answers…….


March 12, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Computers, Government, Media, Other Things, Updates | , , , | 3 Comments

Daniel points to Chris Cilizza’s The Fix and ‘Five Days In May’……

Hello Dog!

Washington Post’s Chris Cilizza has published his latest House Race Ratings on his blog

The Fix

http://blog.washingtonpost.com/thefix/

Scroll down: It’s called “Five Days in May”

Cilizza is spot on with this. If Democrats lose the HI-1 Special Election, they’re TOAST in November.

Daniel G.

Ok…..here’s the piece from the Washington Post about 20 of the more than 40 seats that COULD switch sides……..(but they all won’t )

Five days in May

Five days in May — from the 18th to the 22nd — will tell us much about just how bad the political environment is, and will be, for House Democrats this fall.

On May 18, voters in southwestern Pennsylvania will pick a replacement for the late Rep. John Murtha in a special election. Businessman Tim Burns (R) and former Murtha district director Mark Critz (D) will carry their respective party banners in the 12th district special election.

Four days later, a second special election will be held — this one in Hawaii’s 1st district. Two Democrats — state Sen. Colleen Hanabusaand former Rep. Ed Case — as well as Honolulu City CouncilmanCharles Djou (R) will face off in a winner-take-all race.

For Republicans to build genuine momentum — and perk up what, to date, has been surprisingly sluggish fundraising — it would help immensely to win one of these two races.

House Democrats are currently on an amazing five-race winning streak in contested special election that dates back all the way to 2008 and it’s hard for Republicans to make the case that the majority is in play if they can’t take advantage of the favorable political climate to steal a race in the runup to the midterms. (If Republicans swing and miss at these two races, they’re likely to have a third chance in a special election for former New York Rep. Eric Massa‘s 29th district although Gov. David Paterson has yet to set a special election date.)

On paper, Pennsylvania’s 12th looks like the better of the two options for Republicans as it was the only district in the country to vote for Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) in 2004 and then support Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in 2008.

But, Democrats have a major registration edge in the district and the timing of the special to coincide with primaries across the state likely gives Critz a leg up since Democrats are playing host to very competitive primaries for governor and Senate while Republicans have little going on statewide to help drive turnout for Burns.

Hawaii, however, is shaping up to be a major headache for Democrats for two reasons. First, Case and Hanabusa seem to be moving toward an all-out assault on one another with the likely result being a fractured Democratic party vote. Second, the winner-take-all nature of the special elections means that that sort of splintering of votes between two well-known commodities in the Democratic party could make Djou a winner if he can simply consolidate Republican votes and peel away a few Democratic-leaning independents. (All of the candidates run on a single ballot.)

A loss in a district as Democratic as Hawaii — it is, in fact, President Obama’s home district — would have an effect on Democratic elected officials similar to that of Sen. Scott Brown‘s (R) victory in Massachusetts in January. That is to say, panic.

Below you’ll find our rankings of the 20 House races most likely to switch parties in the November election. As always, the number one ranked race is considered the most vulnerable to a party turnover.

To the Line!

Coming off the Line: Arkansas’ 1st, Alabama’s 2nd, Idaho’s 1st, Washington’s 3rd.
Coming onto the Line: Hawaii’s 1st, New York’s 29th, Pennsylvania’s 15th, Virginia’s 2nd.

20. Pennsylvania’s 15th (Republican-controlled): In an election without much good news, Bethlehem Mayor John Callahan is a Democratic bright spot. Democratic strategists are convinced that he will be coming to Congress based on his candidate skills, internal polling and the fact that Rep. Charlie Dent (R) hasn’t had a serious race since coming to Congress in 2004. It may not be that easy. This is former Rep. Pat Toomey‘s (R) old congressional seat and he’ll need a big turnout in it this fall if he hopes to win the Senate race. (Previous ranking: N/A)

19. Virginia’s 2nd district (D): Rep. Glenn Nye (D) was swept into office in 2008 thanks to a surge in African American turnout in this Virginia Beach-based district where one in every five resident is black. Without President Barack Obama at the top of the ticket, it’s harder to see how Nye gets to the magic 50 percent marker. Auto dealer Scott Rigell (R) faces a primary but with $500,000 in the bank he should be able to navigate those waters for a chance at Nye in the general. (Previous ranking: N/A)

18. Pennsylvania’s 7th district (Democratic controlled): Republicans remain ecstatic about former U.S. Attorney Pat Meehan‘s candidacy although at a recent candidate meet and greet in Washington we were less impressed with him than expected. One thing Meehan clearly does well is raise money; he ended 2009 with $694,000 in the bank. Democrats have rallied behind state Rep. Bryan Lentz who was recently named to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s “Red to Blue” list. (Previous ranking: 20)

17. Hawaii’s 1st (D): As we mentioned above, this special election spells trouble with a capital “T” for Democrats. The infighting between Hanbusa and Case coupled with Djou’s credible candidacy is a problem waiting to happen for the majority party. (Previous ranking: N/A)

16. Florida’s 8th district (D): Rep. Alan Grayson is probably too liberal for this central Florida seat and his strident public pronouncements (and love of the spotlight) don’t do him any favors electorally. But, Grayson’s high profile has helped him raise scads of cash — $861,000 in the final three months of 2009 alone — and preferred Republican nominee Bruce O’Donoghue faces a late (August 24) primary fight. (Previous ranking: 15)

15. Ohio’s 15th district (D): Two years ago, national Republicans believed that state Sen. Steve Stivers was their best candidate in the country. But, he lost by 2,000 (or so) votes to Rep. Mary Jo Kilroy (D). Stivers is back again and without presidential year turnout at THE Ohio State University, Kilroy may struggle to preserve her winning margin from 2008. (Previous ranking: 18)

Continue reading this post »

March 12, 2010 Posted by | Blogs, Breaking News, Daniel G @ PolitcalDog, Government, Media, Men, Other Things, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Updates, Women | , , , , , | 17 Comments

Daniel points to Chris Cilizza's The Fix and 'Five Days In May'……

Hello Dog!

Washington Post’s Chris Cilizza has published his latest House Race Ratings on his blog

The Fix

http://blog.washingtonpost.com/thefix/

Scroll down: It’s called “Five Days in May”

Cilizza is spot on with this. If Democrats lose the HI-1 Special Election, they’re TOAST in November.

Daniel G.

Ok…..here’s the piece from the Washington Post about 20 of the more than 40 seats that COULD switch sides……..(but they all won’t )

Five days in May

Five days in May — from the 18th to the 22nd — will tell us much about just how bad the political environment is, and will be, for House Democrats this fall.

On May 18, voters in southwestern Pennsylvania will pick a replacement for the late Rep. John Murtha in a special election. Businessman Tim Burns (R) and former Murtha district director Mark Critz (D) will carry their respective party banners in the 12th district special election.

Four days later, a second special election will be held — this one in Hawaii’s 1st district. Two Democrats — state Sen. Colleen Hanabusaand former Rep. Ed Case — as well as Honolulu City CouncilmanCharles Djou (R) will face off in a winner-take-all race.

For Republicans to build genuine momentum — and perk up what, to date, has been surprisingly sluggish fundraising — it would help immensely to win one of these two races.

House Democrats are currently on an amazing five-race winning streak in contested special election that dates back all the way to 2008 and it’s hard for Republicans to make the case that the majority is in play if they can’t take advantage of the favorable political climate to steal a race in the runup to the midterms. (If Republicans swing and miss at these two races, they’re likely to have a third chance in a special election for former New York Rep. Eric Massa‘s 29th district although Gov. David Paterson has yet to set a special election date.)

On paper, Pennsylvania’s 12th looks like the better of the two options for Republicans as it was the only district in the country to vote for Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) in 2004 and then support Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in 2008.

But, Democrats have a major registration edge in the district and the timing of the special to coincide with primaries across the state likely gives Critz a leg up since Democrats are playing host to very competitive primaries for governor and Senate while Republicans have little going on statewide to help drive turnout for Burns.

Hawaii, however, is shaping up to be a major headache for Democrats for two reasons. First, Case and Hanabusa seem to be moving toward an all-out assault on one another with the likely result being a fractured Democratic party vote. Second, the winner-take-all nature of the special elections means that that sort of splintering of votes between two well-known commodities in the Democratic party could make Djou a winner if he can simply consolidate Republican votes and peel away a few Democratic-leaning independents. (All of the candidates run on a single ballot.)

A loss in a district as Democratic as Hawaii — it is, in fact, President Obama’s home district — would have an effect on Democratic elected officials similar to that of Sen. Scott Brown‘s (R) victory in Massachusetts in January. That is to say, panic.

Below you’ll find our rankings of the 20 House races most likely to switch parties in the November election. As always, the number one ranked race is considered the most vulnerable to a party turnover.

To the Line!

Coming off the Line: Arkansas’ 1st, Alabama’s 2nd, Idaho’s 1st, Washington’s 3rd.
Coming onto the Line: Hawaii’s 1st, New York’s 29th, Pennsylvania’s 15th, Virginia’s 2nd.

20. Pennsylvania’s 15th (Republican-controlled): In an election without much good news, Bethlehem Mayor John Callahan is a Democratic bright spot. Democratic strategists are convinced that he will be coming to Congress based on his candidate skills, internal polling and the fact that Rep. Charlie Dent (R) hasn’t had a serious race since coming to Congress in 2004. It may not be that easy. This is former Rep. Pat Toomey‘s (R) old congressional seat and he’ll need a big turnout in it this fall if he hopes to win the Senate race. (Previous ranking: N/A)

19. Virginia’s 2nd district (D): Rep. Glenn Nye (D) was swept into office in 2008 thanks to a surge in African American turnout in this Virginia Beach-based district where one in every five resident is black. Without President Barack Obama at the top of the ticket, it’s harder to see how Nye gets to the magic 50 percent marker. Auto dealer Scott Rigell (R) faces a primary but with $500,000 in the bank he should be able to navigate those waters for a chance at Nye in the general. (Previous ranking: N/A)

18. Pennsylvania’s 7th district (Democratic controlled): Republicans remain ecstatic about former U.S. Attorney Pat Meehan‘s candidacy although at a recent candidate meet and greet in Washington we were less impressed with him than expected. One thing Meehan clearly does well is raise money; he ended 2009 with $694,000 in the bank. Democrats have rallied behind state Rep. Bryan Lentz who was recently named to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s “Red to Blue” list. (Previous ranking: 20)

17. Hawaii’s 1st (D): As we mentioned above, this special election spells trouble with a capital “T” for Democrats. The infighting between Hanbusa and Case coupled with Djou’s credible candidacy is a problem waiting to happen for the majority party. (Previous ranking: N/A)

16. Florida’s 8th district (D): Rep. Alan Grayson is probably too liberal for this central Florida seat and his strident public pronouncements (and love of the spotlight) don’t do him any favors electorally. But, Grayson’s high profile has helped him raise scads of cash — $861,000 in the final three months of 2009 alone — and preferred Republican nominee Bruce O’Donoghue faces a late (August 24) primary fight. (Previous ranking: 15)

15. Ohio’s 15th district (D): Two years ago, national Republicans believed that state Sen. Steve Stivers was their best candidate in the country. But, he lost by 2,000 (or so) votes to Rep. Mary Jo Kilroy (D). Stivers is back again and without presidential year turnout at THE Ohio State University, Kilroy may struggle to preserve her winning margin from 2008. (Previous ranking: 18)

Continue reading this post »

March 12, 2010 Posted by | Blogs, Breaking News, Daniel G @ PolitcalDog, Government, Media, Men, Other Things, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Updates, Women | , , , , , | 17 Comments

The Obama White House gears up for 2010…..

The White House is reaching into political races nationwide to urge its preferred candidates to seek election to competitive seats, while helping to nudge weak contenders out of the way, according to party officials familiar with the moves.

The operation is supposed to be on stealth mode…..but you can bet the media is going make quick work out of that….and splash the WH’s doings all over the airwaves, newspapers and the net’……

……To wit……we already know about these moves……

In Connecticut, Mr. Obama called state Attorney General Richard Blumenthal on the day last week that Democratic Sen. Christopher Dodd announced his retirement, highlighting the view of White House officials and Senate leaders that Mr. Blumenthal is the party’s strongest candidate for Mr. Dodd’s seat.

Later last week, in the wake of the news that Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter wouldn’t seek a second term and that Interior Secretary Ken Salazar wouldn’t vie to succeed him, a call by Mr. Obama to Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper signaled the White House’s preference for the next Democratic candidate for governor.

But things don’t always work out how the White House wants it…..

Take New York ….

…….where party leaders had worked to avoid a primary challenge to Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand. Former Tennessee Rep. Harold Ford Jr., who ran an unsuccessful 2006 campaign for Senate in his home state, is exploring a bid in New York, where he has lived for three years. Mr. Ford’s spokesman said he would ignore “party bosses” dissuading him from a run.

So far the White House has been kinda raggedy out there…they better get on their game…..Obama’s future could depend on a friendly Congress in 2012……

January 11, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Government, Media, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Polls, Updates | , , | Leave a comment

Counterpoint…….What if 2010 is Like 1982?

This from Mydd.com…..One never knows…Do one?

by Jonathan Singer, Fri Jan 08, 2010 at 02:43:19 PM EST

I want to loop back and write a little bit more about something I touched on earlier this week: That if the 2010 midterms look like the 1982 midterms — which isn’t inconceivable considering that Barack Obama’s approval rating today looks a lot like Ronald Reagan’s did at the same point in the 1982 cycle — it wouldn’t be terrible news for the Democrats.

Chuck Todd, among others, has written that close Senate elections in a given year don’t tend to split evenly between the two parties, but rather that one party manages to win virtually all the close races. “Check out the competitive races from the last five cycles,” Todd writes. “It’s a remarkable pattern.”

Todd is largely right — close Senate elections do tend to break in one party’s favor. In 2008, Democrats won seven of the eight contests decided by fewer than 10 percentage points; in 2006, they won five of seven; in 2000, they won seven of 10; and in 2004, Republicans won seven of eight such races. (The2002 elections, when the Republicans won six of ten single-digit elections, is somewhat of an exception to this general rule).

But it’s worth looking back to the 1982 midterm elections to bear out an exceedingly important point that is overlooked when reciting the general rule that close Senate elections tend to break in a particular party’s favor: The party winning the close elections isn’t necessarily the one you might expect.

The 1982 midterm elections saw a whopping 11 Senate elections decided by fewer than 10 percentage points. Considering that Ronald Reagan’s approval rating lagged at 43 percent and that the economy, while improving, was still in the doldrums, one might have expected most of these races to have broken in favor of the opposition Democrats. Indeed, in House elections that year, the Democrats were able to capitalize, picking up a net 26 seats.

Yet come election day, the races didn’t break overwhelmingly in the Democrats’ favor. In fact, the opposite occurred, with Reagan’s Republicans winning nine of 11 single-digit Senate elections. Take a look:

Republican Win Democratic Win
California: Pete Wilson 51.5/Jerry Brown 44.8 New Jersey: Frank Lautenberg 50.9/Millicent Fenwich 47.8
Connecticut: Lowell Weicker 50.4/Toby Moffett 46.1 New Mexico: Jeff Bingaman 53.8/Harrison Schmitt 46.2
Indiana: Richard Lugar 53.8/Floyd Fithian 45.6
Minnesota: Dave Durenberger 52.6/Mark Dayton 46.6
Missouri: John Danforth 50.8/Harriet Woods 49.1
Nevada: Chic Hecht 50.1/Howard Cannon 47.7
Rhode Island: John Chafee 51.2/Julius Michaelson 48.8
Vermont: Robert Stafford 50.3/James Guest 47.2
Virginia: Paul trible 51.2/Richard Joseph Davis 48.8

Going into November 1982, there was little reason to believe that the close races would swing for the GOP. The Democrats had strong candidates in most of these states — a Governor, Jerry Brown; an elected state Attorney General, Julius Michaelson; an elected Lieutenant Governor, Richard Joseph Davis; an elected Secretary of State, James Guest; and multiple-term Congressmen Toby Moffett and Floyd Fithian. Reagan’s numbers, as noted above, were in the tank, and the economy was still weak.

But the races mostly swung away from the opposition Democrats. After all the dust settled, the Senate remained firmly in control of the Republicans.

So close Senate races do tend to trend towards one party in a particular cycle, though not every year (see: 2002). When they do, it’s not always to the party you might expect. Sometimes this trend can actually help the party in power, even when that party is headed by a President with an approval rating in the low-40s at a time when the economy is still weaker than expected.

January 8, 2010 Posted by | Government, Media, Other Things, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Polls, Updates | , , , | Leave a comment

Hold on folks!……the GOP is defending more seats in the House than the Democrats!…..

Daniel here at the PoliticalDog has been on my case about the Democrats losing the House…...Well…. hold On!…it seems that the Republicans are going to have to defend more seats than the Democrats!……Take that!

This from the PoliticalWire and the Washington Post’s ‘The Fix’……

GOP Retirements Mount in the House

With news that Rep. Henry Brown (R-SC) will not seek re-election, we noted Republicans now have 14 open House seats to defend this year while Democrats have just 10 open seats so far.

The Fix: “While much of the focus for the last month (or so) has been on Democrats’ retirement problems — set off by a quartet of announcements in swing and Republican-leaning districts over the last month — a broad look at the open seat playing field suggests more parity in terms of the two parties’ opportunities and vulnerabilities than conventional wisdom suggests.”

Oops!


January 4, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Fiction, Government, Media, Men, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Women | , , , , | Leave a comment

A view of the 2010 Gerogia Races……..from SE…….

One of our posters has a good piece on the Races in Georgia for 2010………I will admit I don’t know too much about the races in the state so I’m putting his thoughts out to you……here’s some of the calls……

Insurance  Commissioner  and GOPer John Oxendine for Governor …..over Democrat, ex- Gov Ray Barnes……

Lieutenant Governor: Incumbent GOP Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle is so far running for re-election and he probably won’t have much difficulty winning.

In the Secretary of State job….he’s picking guess who?…yea the GOPer State Senator Brian Kemp….against either democrat Attorney Gary Horlacher or Public Relations Executive Michael Mills.

For Attorney general…….Cobb County Commission Chair Sam Olens is favored…but is will run in a tight race against either State Representative Rob Teilhet or former Dougherty Circuit District Attorney Ken Hodges…..well looka here…he’s calling this race a tight one……

Here’s the link for the piece…..

Note:…..I do see a slight Republican bais…I hope he ‘s right for his sake…or he’ll never hear the end of it……

Thanks SE!……….

January 4, 2010 Posted by | Government, Media, PoliticalDogs SE posts, Politics, Polls | , , , | 7 Comments

Conservative hopes for 2010…….alright, make it wishful thinking…….

I found this over at …firedoglake.com.

Conservative Wishful Thinking Predictions For 2010

By: Eli Friday January 1, 2010 6:01 pm

Inspired by BT’s recap of National Review’s predictions for 2009, I have decided to compile my own list of wishful conservative predictions for the new year:

o 2010 is coldest year in recorded human history, proving once and for all that there is absolutely nothing wrong with Earth’s climate. Al Gore issues public apology and retires to ice floe.

o Yemeni terrorists blow up several planes in worst terrorist attack on U.S. since 9/11. Senate Homeland Security Committee investigation reveals that they were waved through security despite being on no-fly list and wearing bulky explosive vests, because politically-correct TSA agents didn’t want to engage in “racial profiling.”

o DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano forced to resign; Senate Homeland Security Committee Chair Joe Lieberman handpicks Dangerstein to replace her.

o Researchers interview recently divorced couples in every state where gay marriage has been legalized, find that 71% of them split because institution of marriage no longer has any meaning.

o Employee Free Choice Act squeaks through Congress; liberal bloggers enraged by compromises which make unionizing more difficult and require workers to pay dues directly to employers.

o Labor Secretary Hilda Solis forced to resign; replaced by Rick Berman.

o A grateful and thriving Iraq elects George W. Bush president and agrees to contribute 50,000 troops to occupation of Afghanistan, saying, “Hey, it’s the least we can do.”

o Iran launches nuclear missiles at United States of Iraq. President Obama refuses to intervene until Congress forces his hand by passing McCain/Lieberman Declaration Of Bomb Bomb Bomb, Bomb Bomb Iran.

o Secretary Of State Hillary Clinton forced to resign; replaced by General Petraeus.

o Conservative economist announces that after decades of tinkering he has perfected computer model in which cutting taxes for the rich increases government revenue, eliminates unemployment, and cures baldness. Narrow-minded liberal economists savage him mercilessly when he refuses to show his work.

o Vice President Joe Biden forced to resign; replaced by Joe The Plumber.

o Several Democratic politicians busted in embarrassing sex and corruption scandals, but no Republicans.

o A grateful and thriving Wall Street repays all remaining TARP funds and Fed loans with 200% interest, and still has enough money left over to give $1 trillion in bonuses to executives, traders, and fund managers. Subsequent massive spending spree kick-starts economy and saves America.

o Barack Obama’s secret Kenyan birth certificate and Michelle Obama’s “whitey tape” are discovered during remodeling of their former residence in Illinois.

o First Lady Michelle Obama forced to resign; replaced by Obama’s secret Kenyan lover, a senior al Qaeda operative he met through Bill Ayers.

o Republicans win midterm elections in landslide, retaking both houses of Congress. House Speaker-Elect Michele Bachmann vows that impeachment will be first order of business for new Congress, to be immediately followed by “long overdue” reinstatement of House Un-American Activities Committee.

o The rest of President Obama’s Cabinet and inner circle of advisers is forced to resign, except for Chief Of Staff Rahm Emanuel, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, and chief economic adviser Lawrence Summers.

o Christmas wins.

In other words…this guy wants to start all over…and throw out the election……he’ll have to wait for another three years when his people get another try…….

January 2, 2010 Posted by | Fiction, Government, Media, Military, Politics, The Economy | , , | 6 Comments

There's something interesting about the year 2010…..

I have to type it all year…..and it’s starts being interesting with yesterdays 1.1.2010…….then it gets better with the sequence of numbers being able to be read in either direction….here’s the link from the LA Times that highlights  a bit about the years number sequences……

January 2, 2010 Posted by | Education, Media, Other Things | , | Leave a comment