Jamesb101.com

commentary on Politics and a little bit of everything else

Gym Work Out Pet peeves……..

Employees of the software company SAS use their lunch break to stay in shape in a ski conditioning aerobics class.

The Dog used to go a gym to workout…..that was about five or six years ago……

No more……The Dog is a lone wolf most of the time……When it’s warm out the Dog takes a 2 to 5 mile walk most days and combines that with a run every few days of a mile to three……The Dog has been running for about 26 years ……..

I now include biking  in my workouts….

I don’t go to the gym…because I don’t need to pay for my workouts, and some of the reasons mentioned below…..

I hate the gym in January and February, when it’s full of good intentions (“I’m going to lose this couch potato body for real this year!”).
All the machines and cardio equipment are swarming with amateurs who don’t know how to use them, and those of us who do this for real have to reorganize our routines, wait endlessly for equipment to free up, and indulge people who do not know the first thing about gym etiquette. They sit on equipment after they’re done and daydream or watch television. They don’t ask the trainers to show them how to use the machines. They don’t dry themselves off when they come from the pool, leaving puddles of water in the bathroom perfect for slipping and breaking one’s neck.

I’ve been a gym regular for about 20 years now — at a women’s gym in Los Angeles, a fitness center in New Milford, Conn., and a Y.M.C.A. in Manhattan — and I know that all but two of the rookies will be gone by March. Meanwhile, the exercise bike, when I can get one, will not have been dried off and I’ll end up sitting in a puddle of someone else’s sweat.

At times like this, I flee to the weight room where the big guys work out. Talk about serious! These guys didn’t even acknowledge my existence until I had been there four days a week for three years. Then they knew I was serious. I get a half smile from one or another of them every month or so. I love it. It’s like a secret handshake that says, “You may be pathetic, but you’re committed.”

Or this…...

It seems so antiquated, dividing fitness-minded people into two distinct groups. But it might not be such a bad idea, although I’m not advocating segregation based on gender. No, I think people who go to the gym should be separated into two categories: people who are there to work out and people who are not.

This notion came to me one night last week as I did my sit-ups. Nearby, three women were enjoying an animated discussion of their weekend adventures. Although parts of their conversation struck me as insanely intimate, they giggled away, tying up three yoga mats in the process. I did my best to shut them out as I concentrated on my core, feeling like an extra in “Sex and the City.”

Men are equally at fault here. As I reached for a set of dumbbells recently, a young guy bouncing his head in time to his iPod informed me in a too-loud voice that he was using them. I restrained myself from saying: “No buddy, you’re not. You’re listening to Abba.”

No sir…these are not my problems…..I just go out there and be with nature….wether the temperature is 16 degrees or 8o……and it feels great!…..especially…..when I’m finished……He, he, he……

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February 21, 2010 Posted by | Entertainment, Health, Media, Men, Other Things, Sports, Updates, Women | , , | Leave a comment

Stop watching TV and go out a do some exercise……you'll live longer!

According to this piece in the LA Times all that TV watching is shortening your life……

Watching television for hour upon hour obviously isn’t the best way to spend leisure time — inactivity has been linked to obesity and heart disease. But a new study quantifies TV viewing’s effect on risk of death.

Researchers found that each hour a day spent watching TV was linked with an 18% greater risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, an 11% greater risk of all causes of death, and a 9% increased risk of death from cancer.

The study, released Monday in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Assn., looked at health data among 8,800 men and women older than 25 who were part of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study. Participants recorded their television viewing hours for a week, and researchers separated the results by amount of viewing: those who watched less than two hours of TV a day, those who watched two to four hours a day, and those who watched more than four hours a day.

The subjects also had oral glucose tolerance tests to determine blood sugar and gave blood samples to establish cholesterol levels at the beginning of the study. People with a history of cardiovascular disease were not included. In a follow up about six years later, 87 people had died due to cardiovascular disease and 125 of cancer.

Researchers found a strong connection between TV hours and death from cardiovascular disease, not just among the overweight and obese, but among people who had a healthy weight and exercised.

People who watched more than four hours a day showed an 80% greater risk of death from cardiovascular disease and a 46% higher risk of all causes of death compared with those who watched fewer than two hours a day, suggesting that being sedentary could have general deleterious effects. The numbers were the same after the researchers controlled for smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, an unhealthy diet and leisure-time exercise.

“What we showed was that irrespective of a person’s exercise level, sitting for four or more hours watching television was linked to a significant increase in risk of death compared to watching lower amounts of TV,” said Dr. David Dunstan, lead author of the study and professor and head of the Physical Activity Laboratory at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Victoria, Australia. “The message here is that in addition to promoting regular exercise, we also need to promote avoiding long periods of sitting, such as spending long hours in front of the computer screen.”

To him, the results weren’t unexpected. “When we’re in that sitting posture, we’re not using our muscles, and we know from extensive evidence that muscle contractions are important for the body’s regulatory processes, such as the ability to break down glucose and use it as energy.” That can cause insulin resistance, which can trigger a spike in blood sugar levels, possibly leading to type 2 diabetes.

Dr. Prediman K. Shah, director of the cardiology division of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, agreed. He pointed out that muscles become deconditioned when not used, triggering harmful physiological changes. “If your activity is slowing down, you metabolize cholesterol less and synthesize it more,” he said.

Even sporadic exercisers who sit for long periods need to increase their daily activity.

“The physical activity we do over a 24-hour period is important,” says Dr. Gerald F. Fletcher, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and a spokesman for the American Heart Assn.

That means taking the stairs instead of the elevator, gardening, walking the dog . . .

“For couch potatoes, sitting on your duff is hazardous to your health,” Shah said. “The bottom line is keep moving.”

jeannine.stein@latimes.com

Note:…I do get a bit sore sitting here for hours typing this stuff…….

January 13, 2010 Posted by | Education, Entertainment, Health, Media, Other Things | , , | Leave a comment

Stop watching TV and go out a do some exercise……you’ll live longer!

According to this piece in the LA Times all that TV watching is shortening your life……

Watching television for hour upon hour obviously isn’t the best way to spend leisure time — inactivity has been linked to obesity and heart disease. But a new study quantifies TV viewing’s effect on risk of death.

Researchers found that each hour a day spent watching TV was linked with an 18% greater risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, an 11% greater risk of all causes of death, and a 9% increased risk of death from cancer.

The study, released Monday in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Assn., looked at health data among 8,800 men and women older than 25 who were part of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study. Participants recorded their television viewing hours for a week, and researchers separated the results by amount of viewing: those who watched less than two hours of TV a day, those who watched two to four hours a day, and those who watched more than four hours a day.

The subjects also had oral glucose tolerance tests to determine blood sugar and gave blood samples to establish cholesterol levels at the beginning of the study. People with a history of cardiovascular disease were not included. In a follow up about six years later, 87 people had died due to cardiovascular disease and 125 of cancer.

Researchers found a strong connection between TV hours and death from cardiovascular disease, not just among the overweight and obese, but among people who had a healthy weight and exercised.

People who watched more than four hours a day showed an 80% greater risk of death from cardiovascular disease and a 46% higher risk of all causes of death compared with those who watched fewer than two hours a day, suggesting that being sedentary could have general deleterious effects. The numbers were the same after the researchers controlled for smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, an unhealthy diet and leisure-time exercise.

“What we showed was that irrespective of a person’s exercise level, sitting for four or more hours watching television was linked to a significant increase in risk of death compared to watching lower amounts of TV,” said Dr. David Dunstan, lead author of the study and professor and head of the Physical Activity Laboratory at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Victoria, Australia. “The message here is that in addition to promoting regular exercise, we also need to promote avoiding long periods of sitting, such as spending long hours in front of the computer screen.”

To him, the results weren’t unexpected. “When we’re in that sitting posture, we’re not using our muscles, and we know from extensive evidence that muscle contractions are important for the body’s regulatory processes, such as the ability to break down glucose and use it as energy.” That can cause insulin resistance, which can trigger a spike in blood sugar levels, possibly leading to type 2 diabetes.

Dr. Prediman K. Shah, director of the cardiology division of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, agreed. He pointed out that muscles become deconditioned when not used, triggering harmful physiological changes. “If your activity is slowing down, you metabolize cholesterol less and synthesize it more,” he said.

Even sporadic exercisers who sit for long periods need to increase their daily activity.

“The physical activity we do over a 24-hour period is important,” says Dr. Gerald F. Fletcher, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and a spokesman for the American Heart Assn.

That means taking the stairs instead of the elevator, gardening, walking the dog . . .

“For couch potatoes, sitting on your duff is hazardous to your health,” Shah said. “The bottom line is keep moving.”

jeannine.stein@latimes.com

Note:…I do get a bit sore sitting here for hours typing this stuff…….

January 13, 2010 Posted by | Education, Entertainment, Health, Media, Other Things | , , | Leave a comment

Fat camps for overweight dogs and cats…..and human self-control….

I had to post this one…it’s about a place in Greenpoint,  Brooklyn, New York that offers a ‘fat-camp’ for overweight pets……the program is aimed at reducing the amount food an animal eats and offering those pets that can do it…excersize….

Folks watch how you feed your pets….my beagle ‘ucy’ was over weight before we lost herb to cancer…and I will be the first one to admit that she ate too much food….everytime that dog looked at some in my house with those eyes…they feed her…WHICH WAS NO GOOD!

We all need to respect our pets and refrain from over feeding them….dogs especially will eat and eat, throw up…and then go back and eat some more…..

The second thing you need to do is to watch those by-products….the pet foods that have more of them offer a meal that is harder for your pet to digest……

November 25, 2009 Posted by | Animals, Food, Health | , , , | Leave a comment