Jamesb101.com

commentary on Politics and a little bit of everything else

‘Don’t Ask ….Don’t Tell’ didn’t last one day……..

I did a post yesterday on “Don’t Ask…Don’t Tell’,  in which I said ……..’The Dog cautions everyone to wait for when the debate goes public.’..

……well, here it is one day later and ……And the leading House Democrat on military policy  (Rep. Ike Skelton (D-Mo.) said Friday that …’he opposes repealing the law that bans openly gay people from serving in the military’.

Seventeen years ago, Rep. Ike Skelton (D-Mo.) played a major role in crafting the controversial law known as “Don’t ask, don’t tell.” When President Bill Clinton wanted to lift the ban preventing gay people from joining the military, Skelton opposed the move. The end result was a compromise under which gay service members would conceal their sexual orientation.

He said the full House Armed Services Committee won’t hold a hearing on the repeal of the law. Rather, the Personnel subcommittee will hold the hearing at some point this year.

Skelton also said he would oppose efforts to repeal the law in Congress — setting the stage for a potentially intense debate within his own committee with Democrats who want to see the law repealed.

Meanwhile, Skelton’s Senate counterpart, Carl Levin (D-Mich.), said that the Senate Armed Services Committee will hold a hearing on the issue at the end of January.

The issue is Dead on Arrival…..another gay related issue put in the shelf…..

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January 15, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Government, Health, Law, Media, Men, Military, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Polls, Religion, Updates | , , , | Leave a comment

'Don't Ask ….Don't Tell' didn't last one day……..

I did a post yesterday on “Don’t Ask…Don’t Tell’,  in which I said ……..’The Dog cautions everyone to wait for when the debate goes public.’..

……well, here it is one day later and ……And the leading House Democrat on military policy  (Rep. Ike Skelton (D-Mo.) said Friday that …’he opposes repealing the law that bans openly gay people from serving in the military’.

Seventeen years ago, Rep. Ike Skelton (D-Mo.) played a major role in crafting the controversial law known as “Don’t ask, don’t tell.” When President Bill Clinton wanted to lift the ban preventing gay people from joining the military, Skelton opposed the move. The end result was a compromise under which gay service members would conceal their sexual orientation.

He said the full House Armed Services Committee won’t hold a hearing on the repeal of the law. Rather, the Personnel subcommittee will hold the hearing at some point this year.

Skelton also said he would oppose efforts to repeal the law in Congress — setting the stage for a potentially intense debate within his own committee with Democrats who want to see the law repealed.

Meanwhile, Skelton’s Senate counterpart, Carl Levin (D-Mich.), said that the Senate Armed Services Committee will hold a hearing on the issue at the end of January.

The issue is Dead on Arrival…..another gay related issue put in the shelf…..

January 15, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Government, Health, Law, Media, Men, Military, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Polls, Religion, Updates | , , , | Leave a comment

Haiti Updates……..Military…..

The military response ramps up…….

USCG, DOD Mobilize For Haiti Relief

Jan 14, 2010

By Jim Ott

The U.S. Coast Guard mobilized air and sea units just after the Jan. 12 earthquake that struck Haiti, District 7 headquarters in Miami says. As of the afternoon of Jan. 13, four Coast Guard cutters and nine aircraft were operating to aid in the humanitarian effort.

U.S. Southern Command dispatched a team of 30 engineers, planners and a command and control group to Haiti on a Puerto Rico Air National Guard C-130 Hercules.

The team will assess the situation and coordinate with the United Nations and the Haitian government. Initial assessments of damage were made in overflights by a U.S. Navy P-3 Orion.

The earthquake closed Port-au-Prince International Airport to all but emergency flights, and left its control tower inoperative. Initial reports said the Port-au-Prince tower had collapsed in the quake, which caused widespread devastation in the city and surrounding area.

A member of the U.S. State Dept. Haiti Task Force said the U.S. Coast Guard was operating flights into the airport that were controlled from a USCG cutter operating in the bay outside the city. A U.S. government team was expected to arrive later on Jan. 13 to begin air traffic control in place of the tower.

The quake, measuring 7.0 on the Richter scale, was concentrated in Haiti’s capital city. Tremors were felt throughout the Caribbean including Cuba, Jamaica and Venezuela on the north coast of South America.

Air Caraibes officials said that an A330 inbound to Port-au-Prince Jan. 12 was diverted to Guadeloupe and flights were canceled as of Jan. 13. The airline anticipates that service will resume on Jan. 16.

Airline service from all points to Port-au-Prince was canceled Jan. 13. JetBlue is waiving fees and fare differences if travelers rebooked flights by Jan. 15 to the Dominican Republic, which occupies the other end of the stricken island. Spirit Airlines canceled its flights to Haiti on Jan. 13 and is working on a relief effort. Haiti’s aviation authority issued a Notice to Airmen that only flights carrying emergency aid and equipment would be permitted.

Photo: USCG

January 14, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Government, Haiti, Media, Military, Updates | , | 3 Comments

American’s are not wanted in Pakistan…….

I did a post a while ago about the sensitivity of the Pakistani population to an American escalation of the war against the Taliban and al-Qeada…..well things are getting worst….while the administration does not want to make a big deal about this…..the Big bosses in Pakistan are all right with the war build-up…..the middle to lower ones are not……..The New York Times has broke the story that Pakistan Military and Intelligence people have begun a coordinated program to harass and inhibit Americans from doing ‘war’ business in their country……in other words…‘They want to the American’s to pack up and leave their country’…..

This is not light matter…..

I posted earlier that the average Pakistani hates that United States flys Predator drones from bases in their country……they fear that civilians will be killed in the UAV attacks…..in addition, the average Pakistani is more worried about Indian aggression then the Taliban and al-Quedea…which are not looked as problems……

So as the United States and NATO ramp up their war campiagn in Aftghanistn (30, 000+ troops and additional militray aid $$$ to Pakistan…which is now on hold)….American personnel are not getting Pakistani help…..they are getting shown the door…….

All of the negative headlines about Blackwater, which now calls it self the Xe company hasn’t help stopped the Pakistani whispering campaigns against Americans…..

The United States has growing problem with the countries police, and military, who have targeted american diplomats and military members for all forms of petty harassment……The Big bosses seem powerless to prevent these situations from escalating……..

December 16, 2009 Posted by | Breaking News, Government, Media, Military, Politics, Travel | , , , , , | 22 Comments

American's are not wanted in Pakistan…….

I did a post a while ago about the sensitivity of the Pakistani population to an American escalation of the war against the Taliban and al-Qeada…..well things are getting worst….while the administration does not want to make a big deal about this…..the Big bosses in Pakistan are all right with the war build-up…..the middle to lower ones are not……..The New York Times has broke the story that Pakistan Military and Intelligence people have begun a coordinated program to harass and inhibit Americans from doing ‘war’ business in their country……in other words…‘They want to the American’s to pack up and leave their country’…..

This is not light matter…..

I posted earlier that the average Pakistani hates that United States flys Predator drones from bases in their country……they fear that civilians will be killed in the UAV attacks…..in addition, the average Pakistani is more worried about Indian aggression then the Taliban and al-Quedea…which are not looked as problems……

So as the United States and NATO ramp up their war campiagn in Aftghanistn (30, 000+ troops and additional militray aid $$$ to Pakistan…which is now on hold)….American personnel are not getting Pakistani help…..they are getting shown the door…….

All of the negative headlines about Blackwater, which now calls it self the Xe company hasn’t help stopped the Pakistani whispering campaigns against Americans…..

The United States has growing problem with the countries police, and military, who have targeted american diplomats and military members for all forms of petty harassment……The Big bosses seem powerless to prevent these situations from escalating……..

December 16, 2009 Posted by | Breaking News, Government, Media, Military, Politics, Travel | , , , , , | 22 Comments

President Obama’s speech at Fort Hood honoring those who suffered in the tragedy there….

From Politico and NBC……..

November 10, 2009

Obama’s Best Speech Ever

President Obama’s speech at Fort Hood may go down as one of his best ever.

The president was able to balance his duties as Commander in Chief while consoling a nation in the aftermath of a terrible tragedy. That he was able to do this while taking away the focus on the shooter’s religion was even more impressive.

It was one of those speeches that makes you especially proud to be an American.

Marc Ambinder: “I guarantee: they’ll be teaching this one in rhetoric classes. It was that good. My gloss won’t do it justice. Yes, I’m having a Chris Matthews-chill-running-up-my-leg moment, but sometimes, the man, the moment and the words come together and meet the challenge. Obama had to lead a nation’s grieving; he had to try and address the thorny issues of Islam and terrorism; to be firm; to express the spirit of America, using familiar, comforting tropes in a way that didn’t sound trite.”

Here’s the link for the video…..

Here’s the transcript……..

Remarks of President Obama

Memorial Service at Fort Hood
November 10, 2009

We come together filled with sorrow for the thirteen Americans that we have lost; with gratitude for the lives that they led; and with a determination to honor them through the work we carry on.

This is a time of war. And yet these Americans did not die on a foreign field of battle. They were killed here, on American soil, in the heart of this great American community. It is this fact that makes the tragedy even more painful and even more incomprehensible.

For those families who have lost a loved one, no words can fill the void that has been left. We knew these men and women as soldiers and caregivers. You knew them as mothers and fathers; sons and daughters; sisters and brothers.

But here is what you must also know: your loved ones endure through the life of our nation. Their memory will be honored in the places they lived and by the people they touched. Their life’s work is our security, and the freedom that we too often take for granted. Every evening that the sun sets on a tranquil town; every dawn that a flag is unfurled; every moment that an American enjoys life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness – that is their legacy.

Neither this country – nor the values that we were founded upon – could exist without men and women like these thirteen Americans. And that is why we must pay tribute to their stories.

Chief Warrant Officer Michael Cahill had served in the National Guard and worked as a physician’s assistant for decades. A husband and father of three, he was so committed to his patients that on the day he died, he was back at work just weeks after having a heart attack.

Major Libardo Eduardo Caraveo spoke little English when he came to America as a teenager. But he put himself through college, earned a PhD, and was helping combat units cope with the stress of deployment. He is survived by his wife, sons and step-daughters.

Staff Sergeant Justin DeCrow joined the Army right after high school, married his high school sweetheart, and had served as a light wheeled mechanic and Satellite Communications Operator. He was known as an optimist, a mentor, and a loving husband and father.

After retiring from the Army as a Major, John Gaffaney cared for society’s most vulnerable during two decades as a psychiatric nurse. He spent three years trying to return to active duty in this time of war, and he was preparing to deploy to Iraq as a Captain. He leaves behind a wife and son.

Specialist Frederick Greene was a Tennessean who wanted to join the Army for a long time, and did so in 2008 with the support of his family. As a combat engineer he was a natural leader, and he is survived by his wife and two daughters.

Specialist Jason Hunt was also recently married, with three children to care for. He joined the Army after high school. He did a tour in Iraq, and it was there that he re-enlisted for six more years on his 21st birthday so that he could continue to serve.

Staff Sergeant Amy Krueger was an athlete in high school, joined the Army shortly after 9/11, and had since returned home to speak to students about her experience. When her mother told her she couldn’t take on Osama bin Laden by herself, Amy replied: “Watch me.”

Private First Class Aaron Nemelka was an Eagle Scout who just recently signed up to do one of the most dangerous jobs in the service – diffuse bombs – so that he could help save lives. He was proudly carrying on a tradition of military service that runs deep within his family.

Private First Class Michael Pearson loved his family and loved his music, and his goal was to be a music teacher. He excelled at playing the guitar, and could create songs on the spot and show others how to play. He joined the military a year ago, and was preparing for his first deployment.

Captain Russell Seager worked as a nurse for the VA, helping veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress. He had great respect for the military, and signed up to serve so that he could help soldiers cope with the stress of combat and return to civilian life. He leaves behind a wife and son.

Private Francheska Velez, the daughter of a father from Colombia and a Puerto Rican mother, had recently served in Korea and in Iraq, and was pursuing a career in the Army. When she was killed, she was pregnant with her first child, and was excited about becoming a mother.

Lieutenant Colonel Juanita Warman was the daughter and granddaughter of Army veterans. She was a single mother who put herself through college and graduate school, and served as a nurse practitioner while raising her two daughters. She also left behind a loving husband.

Private First Class Kham Xiong came to America from Thailand as a small child. He was a husband and father who followed his brother into the military because his family had a strong history of service. He was preparing for his first deployment to Afghanistan.

These men and women came from all parts of the country. Some had long careers in the military. Some had signed up to serve in the shadow of 9/11. Some had known intense combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, and some cared for those did. Their lives speak to the strength, the dignity and the decency of those who serve, and that is how they will be remembered.

That same spirit is embodied in the community here at Fort Hood, and in the many wounded who are still recovering. In those terrible minutes during the attack, soldiers made makeshift tourniquets out of their clothes. They braved gunfire to reach the wounded, and ferried them to safety in the backs of cars and a pick-up truck.

One young soldier, Amber Bahr, was so intent on helping others that she did not realize for some time that she, herself, had been shot in the back. Two police officers – Mark Todd and Kim Munley – saved countless lives by risking their own. One medic – Francisco de la Serna – treated both Officer Munley and the gunman who shot her.

It may be hard to comprehend the twisted logic that led to this tragedy. But this much we do know – no faith justifies these murderous and craven acts; no just and loving God looks upon them with favor. And for what he has done, we know that the killer will be met with justice – in this world, and the next.

These are trying times for our country. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, the same extremists who killed nearly 3,000 Americans continue to endanger America, our allies, and innocent Afghans and Pakistanis. In Iraq, we are working to bring a war to a successful end, as there are still those who would deny the Iraqi people the future that Americans and Iraqis have sacrificed so much for.

As we face these challenges, the stories of those at Fort Hood reaffirm the core values that we are fighting for, and the strength that we must draw upon. Theirs are tales of American men and women answering an extraordinary call – the call to serve their comrades, their communities, and their country. In an age of selfishness, they embody responsibility. In an era of division, they call upon us to come together. In a time of cynicism, they remind us of who we are as Americans.

We are a nation that endures because of the courage of those who defend it. We saw that valor in those who braved bullets here at Fort Hood, just as surely as we see it in those who signed up knowing that they would serve in harm’s way.

We are a nation of laws whose commitment to justice is so enduring that we would treat a gunman and give him due process, just as surely as we will see that he pays for his crimes.

We are a nation that guarantees the freedom to worship as one chooses. And instead of claiming God for our side, we remember Lincoln’s words, and always pray to be on the side of God.

We are a nation that is dedicated to the proposition that all men and women are created equal. We live that truth within our military, and see it in the varied backgrounds of those we lay to rest today. We defend that truth at home and abroad, and we know that Americans will always be found on the side of liberty and equality. That is who we are as a people.

Tomorrow is Veterans Day. It is a chance to pause, and to pay tribute – for students to learn of the struggles that preceded them; for families to honor the service of parents and grandparents; for citizens to reflect upon the sacrifices that have been made in pursuit of a more perfect union.

For history is filled with heroes. You may remember the stories of a grandfather who marched across Europe; an uncle who fought in Vietnam; a sister who served in the Gulf. But as we honor the many generations who have served, I think all of us – every single American – must acknowledge that this generation has more than proved itself the equal of those who have come before.

We need not look to the past for greatness, because it is before our very eyes.

This generation of soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen have volunteered in a time of certain danger. They are part of the finest fighting force that the world has ever known. They have served tour after tour of duty in distant, different and difficult places. They have stood watch in blinding deserts and on snowy mountains. They have extended the opportunity of self-government to peoples that have suffered tyranny and war. They are man and woman; white, black, and brown; of all faiths and stations – all Americans, serving together to protect our people, while giving others half a world away the chance to lead a better life.

In today’s wars, there is not always a simple ceremony that signals our troops’ success – no surrender papers to be signed, or capital to be claimed. But the measure of their impact is no less great – in a world of threats that no know borders, it will be marked in the safety of our cities and towns, and the security and opportunity that is extended abroad. And it will serve as testimony to the character of those who serve, and the example that you set for America and for the world.

Here, at Fort Hood, we pay tribute to thirteen men and women who were not able to escape the horror of war, even in the comfort of home. Later today, at Fort Lewis, one community will gather to remember so many in one Stryker Brigade who have fallen in Afghanistan.

Long after they are laid to rest – when the fighting has finished, and our nation has endured; when today’s servicemen and women are veterans, and their children have grown – it will be said of this generation that they believed under the most trying of tests; that they persevered not just when it was easy, but when it was hard; and that they paid the price and bore the burden to secure this nation, and stood up for the values that live in the hearts of all free peoples.

So we say goodbye to those who now belong to eternity. We press ahead in pursuit of the peace that guided their service. May God bless the memory of those we lost. And may God bless the United States of America.

 

November 11, 2009 Posted by | Crime, Government, Men, Military, Politics | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

President Obama's speech at Fort Hood honoring those who suffered in the tragedy there….

From Politico and NBC……..

November 10, 2009

Obama’s Best Speech Ever

President Obama’s speech at Fort Hood may go down as one of his best ever.

The president was able to balance his duties as Commander in Chief while consoling a nation in the aftermath of a terrible tragedy. That he was able to do this while taking away the focus on the shooter’s religion was even more impressive.

It was one of those speeches that makes you especially proud to be an American.

Marc Ambinder: “I guarantee: they’ll be teaching this one in rhetoric classes. It was that good. My gloss won’t do it justice. Yes, I’m having a Chris Matthews-chill-running-up-my-leg moment, but sometimes, the man, the moment and the words come together and meet the challenge. Obama had to lead a nation’s grieving; he had to try and address the thorny issues of Islam and terrorism; to be firm; to express the spirit of America, using familiar, comforting tropes in a way that didn’t sound trite.”

Here’s the link for the video…..

Here’s the transcript……..

Remarks of President Obama

Memorial Service at Fort Hood
November 10, 2009

We come together filled with sorrow for the thirteen Americans that we have lost; with gratitude for the lives that they led; and with a determination to honor them through the work we carry on.

This is a time of war. And yet these Americans did not die on a foreign field of battle. They were killed here, on American soil, in the heart of this great American community. It is this fact that makes the tragedy even more painful and even more incomprehensible.

For those families who have lost a loved one, no words can fill the void that has been left. We knew these men and women as soldiers and caregivers. You knew them as mothers and fathers; sons and daughters; sisters and brothers.

But here is what you must also know: your loved ones endure through the life of our nation. Their memory will be honored in the places they lived and by the people they touched. Their life’s work is our security, and the freedom that we too often take for granted. Every evening that the sun sets on a tranquil town; every dawn that a flag is unfurled; every moment that an American enjoys life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness – that is their legacy.

Neither this country – nor the values that we were founded upon – could exist without men and women like these thirteen Americans. And that is why we must pay tribute to their stories.

Chief Warrant Officer Michael Cahill had served in the National Guard and worked as a physician’s assistant for decades. A husband and father of three, he was so committed to his patients that on the day he died, he was back at work just weeks after having a heart attack.

Major Libardo Eduardo Caraveo spoke little English when he came to America as a teenager. But he put himself through college, earned a PhD, and was helping combat units cope with the stress of deployment. He is survived by his wife, sons and step-daughters.

Staff Sergeant Justin DeCrow joined the Army right after high school, married his high school sweetheart, and had served as a light wheeled mechanic and Satellite Communications Operator. He was known as an optimist, a mentor, and a loving husband and father.

After retiring from the Army as a Major, John Gaffaney cared for society’s most vulnerable during two decades as a psychiatric nurse. He spent three years trying to return to active duty in this time of war, and he was preparing to deploy to Iraq as a Captain. He leaves behind a wife and son.

Specialist Frederick Greene was a Tennessean who wanted to join the Army for a long time, and did so in 2008 with the support of his family. As a combat engineer he was a natural leader, and he is survived by his wife and two daughters.

Specialist Jason Hunt was also recently married, with three children to care for. He joined the Army after high school. He did a tour in Iraq, and it was there that he re-enlisted for six more years on his 21st birthday so that he could continue to serve.

Staff Sergeant Amy Krueger was an athlete in high school, joined the Army shortly after 9/11, and had since returned home to speak to students about her experience. When her mother told her she couldn’t take on Osama bin Laden by herself, Amy replied: “Watch me.”

Private First Class Aaron Nemelka was an Eagle Scout who just recently signed up to do one of the most dangerous jobs in the service – diffuse bombs – so that he could help save lives. He was proudly carrying on a tradition of military service that runs deep within his family.

Private First Class Michael Pearson loved his family and loved his music, and his goal was to be a music teacher. He excelled at playing the guitar, and could create songs on the spot and show others how to play. He joined the military a year ago, and was preparing for his first deployment.

Captain Russell Seager worked as a nurse for the VA, helping veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress. He had great respect for the military, and signed up to serve so that he could help soldiers cope with the stress of combat and return to civilian life. He leaves behind a wife and son.

Private Francheska Velez, the daughter of a father from Colombia and a Puerto Rican mother, had recently served in Korea and in Iraq, and was pursuing a career in the Army. When she was killed, she was pregnant with her first child, and was excited about becoming a mother.

Lieutenant Colonel Juanita Warman was the daughter and granddaughter of Army veterans. She was a single mother who put herself through college and graduate school, and served as a nurse practitioner while raising her two daughters. She also left behind a loving husband.

Private First Class Kham Xiong came to America from Thailand as a small child. He was a husband and father who followed his brother into the military because his family had a strong history of service. He was preparing for his first deployment to Afghanistan.

These men and women came from all parts of the country. Some had long careers in the military. Some had signed up to serve in the shadow of 9/11. Some had known intense combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, and some cared for those did. Their lives speak to the strength, the dignity and the decency of those who serve, and that is how they will be remembered.

That same spirit is embodied in the community here at Fort Hood, and in the many wounded who are still recovering. In those terrible minutes during the attack, soldiers made makeshift tourniquets out of their clothes. They braved gunfire to reach the wounded, and ferried them to safety in the backs of cars and a pick-up truck.

One young soldier, Amber Bahr, was so intent on helping others that she did not realize for some time that she, herself, had been shot in the back. Two police officers – Mark Todd and Kim Munley – saved countless lives by risking their own. One medic – Francisco de la Serna – treated both Officer Munley and the gunman who shot her.

It may be hard to comprehend the twisted logic that led to this tragedy. But this much we do know – no faith justifies these murderous and craven acts; no just and loving God looks upon them with favor. And for what he has done, we know that the killer will be met with justice – in this world, and the next.

These are trying times for our country. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, the same extremists who killed nearly 3,000 Americans continue to endanger America, our allies, and innocent Afghans and Pakistanis. In Iraq, we are working to bring a war to a successful end, as there are still those who would deny the Iraqi people the future that Americans and Iraqis have sacrificed so much for.

As we face these challenges, the stories of those at Fort Hood reaffirm the core values that we are fighting for, and the strength that we must draw upon. Theirs are tales of American men and women answering an extraordinary call – the call to serve their comrades, their communities, and their country. In an age of selfishness, they embody responsibility. In an era of division, they call upon us to come together. In a time of cynicism, they remind us of who we are as Americans.

We are a nation that endures because of the courage of those who defend it. We saw that valor in those who braved bullets here at Fort Hood, just as surely as we see it in those who signed up knowing that they would serve in harm’s way.

We are a nation of laws whose commitment to justice is so enduring that we would treat a gunman and give him due process, just as surely as we will see that he pays for his crimes.

We are a nation that guarantees the freedom to worship as one chooses. And instead of claiming God for our side, we remember Lincoln’s words, and always pray to be on the side of God.

We are a nation that is dedicated to the proposition that all men and women are created equal. We live that truth within our military, and see it in the varied backgrounds of those we lay to rest today. We defend that truth at home and abroad, and we know that Americans will always be found on the side of liberty and equality. That is who we are as a people.

Tomorrow is Veterans Day. It is a chance to pause, and to pay tribute – for students to learn of the struggles that preceded them; for families to honor the service of parents and grandparents; for citizens to reflect upon the sacrifices that have been made in pursuit of a more perfect union.

For history is filled with heroes. You may remember the stories of a grandfather who marched across Europe; an uncle who fought in Vietnam; a sister who served in the Gulf. But as we honor the many generations who have served, I think all of us – every single American – must acknowledge that this generation has more than proved itself the equal of those who have come before.

We need not look to the past for greatness, because it is before our very eyes.

This generation of soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen have volunteered in a time of certain danger. They are part of the finest fighting force that the world has ever known. They have served tour after tour of duty in distant, different and difficult places. They have stood watch in blinding deserts and on snowy mountains. They have extended the opportunity of self-government to peoples that have suffered tyranny and war. They are man and woman; white, black, and brown; of all faiths and stations – all Americans, serving together to protect our people, while giving others half a world away the chance to lead a better life.

In today’s wars, there is not always a simple ceremony that signals our troops’ success – no surrender papers to be signed, or capital to be claimed. But the measure of their impact is no less great – in a world of threats that no know borders, it will be marked in the safety of our cities and towns, and the security and opportunity that is extended abroad. And it will serve as testimony to the character of those who serve, and the example that you set for America and for the world.

Here, at Fort Hood, we pay tribute to thirteen men and women who were not able to escape the horror of war, even in the comfort of home. Later today, at Fort Lewis, one community will gather to remember so many in one Stryker Brigade who have fallen in Afghanistan.

Long after they are laid to rest – when the fighting has finished, and our nation has endured; when today’s servicemen and women are veterans, and their children have grown – it will be said of this generation that they believed under the most trying of tests; that they persevered not just when it was easy, but when it was hard; and that they paid the price and bore the burden to secure this nation, and stood up for the values that live in the hearts of all free peoples.

So we say goodbye to those who now belong to eternity. We press ahead in pursuit of the peace that guided their service. May God bless the memory of those we lost. And may God bless the United States of America.

 

November 11, 2009 Posted by | Crime, Government, Men, Military, Politics | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Obama on Don't Ask ….Don't Tell…..Don't wait people…it's gonna be a while…..

In order to get elected you’ve got to promise different groups of people different things……President Obama is no different on this…He’s a politician…….

The media and gay americans have been waiting for the President to for-fill his pledge to abolish the gay policy of the Defense Department…Don\’t ask..Don\’t tell……mindful of the fact that last two term democratic president got into a huge fight with military at the start of his first term, on the  issue…..and that he never had the things the same with the military…President Obama isn’t in any hurry to make the same mistake……so….he’s gonna continue to say he\’s gonna get rid of the policy…but with a whole lot of things going on with the military in the Middle East and his reliance on the troops…..one could understand that DADT is something he might not want to deal with………

October 11, 2009 Posted by | Law, Military, Politics | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Obama on Don’t Ask ….Don’t Tell…..Don’t wait people…it’s gonna be a while…..

In order to get elected you’ve got to promise different groups of people different things……President Obama is no different on this…He’s a politician…….

The media and gay americans have been waiting for the President to for-fill his pledge to abolish the gay policy of the Defense Department…Don\’t ask..Don\’t tell……mindful of the fact that last two term democratic president got into a huge fight with military at the start of his first term, on the  issue…..and that he never had the things the same with the military…President Obama isn’t in any hurry to make the same mistake……so….he’s gonna continue to say he\’s gonna get rid of the policy…but with a whole lot of things going on with the military in the Middle East and his reliance on the troops…..one could understand that DADT is something he might not want to deal with………

October 11, 2009 Posted by | Law, Military, Politics | , , , , , | Leave a comment

As expected….Gen. McChrystal asks for more troops….but that's not the important part………

The Washington Post in a piece  today, has posted a copy of a 66 page assessment done by General Stanley  McChrystal today……the General is scheduled to go up to the Hill on September 24 ,to give a report on things in Afghanistan……. While he has been told by National Security Chief , Gen. James Jones, and others, to find another way…..McChrystal has pushed ahead with a request for more troops…..

Now politically, the President, the nations CIC, is getting pushed into a corner by his own party, just like in the Healthcare issue……but just like in the Healthcare issue Obama will have to push back, and take his own council…..

I posted earlier that Aftghlnisan has a major problem that will make the present push there fail ultimately, and General McChrystal knows this ……His military staff must be experiencing a sense of deja’ vue…in that they are at the same spot that Patreaus was in with Bush II,  a year and a half ago……..Knowing that the troop level was too low to sustain any improvement on the ground , Patreaus endeavored to get Bush to rectify Sec. of Defense Rummsfeld’s mistake, in not using enough troops in the first place in Iraq….McChrystal finds himself in the same situation….he MUST have more troops to hold, and take more ground..it’s that simple….but the important part comes next…..

McChrystal clearly states that there must be NATION BUILDING to win in that country…..anything short of that goal will render any military gains useless… he’s smart,  and he’s right…..without improving the nations infrastructure, without improving the nations reliance on opium, without dealing with the rampant corruption, and without rising the countries standard of living… things will not work……

…It is not just a military campaign that McChrystal wants,  but Nation Building again, to hold on to, and expand gains in order that country become ultimately self reliant…..

McChrystal has it right……And civilian deserves the additional troops, civilian support and one chance  up at bat….Obama can ill afford to be the guy who ‘lost’ Afghanistan…..

Update:…...a lot if people are miffed at the fact that the 66 pager got outed to the Washington Post……Theories abound…was it McChrystal’s staff?…Are they trying to pressure the Commander-in-Chief into a decision?……Are they try to do a Patreaus?…….

……Listen…the fact remains everyone knew he was going to ask for more troops…..the field commanders that are executing the war campaign I’m sure ARE anxious to get the White House off the dime , and starting to supply more troops, if the objective is to take ground, and have enough troops to hold it………I see Biden advocated the counterrorist strategy proposed before, that uses kill teams roaming the whole AFPAK region, which has a smaller footprint,t but doe snot address NATION BUILDING and still needs Afghan and Pakistani ground troops to hold ground…..which is something that does not exist right now……

Update #2…….The Cable/Foreign Policy blog reports that Obama may have asked McChrystal to ‘scrub’ any requests for more troops……something I doubt Gen. McChrystal or Patreaus would due after all the introspection the army hierarchy went thru with Rumsfelds bullying them into going into Iraq ‘light’ the second time……..

Update#3……..Gen. McChrystal flew from London, with his wife to have a meeting aboard Air Force One with the the Presdient. in the Danish capital….while his wife got the 25 minute tour  of the plane, the CIC and General McChrystal had a face to face in the confrence room on board the plane…I would assume that the NSC advisor Jones would be the only WH heavy weight in the room…..it’s about time the CIC, and McChrystal had a serious talk, face to face, without the WH staff  present……

September 21, 2009 Posted by | Military, Politics | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments