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Afghanistan…..First the ‘stick’….Then after….. the ‘carrot’……

The United States….. feeling that they are taking the war in Afghanistan to the Taliban …and emboldening Pakistan to do the same….. finds itself in position to start thinking about an end game…even as the ‘surge’ troop levels continues to climb…..

The Dog implores everyone to stop and think about this…..

I don’t care what people say…’surges’ work….and their use by Obama has only served to reinforce the fact the then Defense Secretary Rumsfield was a miserably bad director of this country’s first campaign in Iraq…..

By disregarding the ‘Powell Doctrine’of using overwhelming force…. he wasted lives and caused billions of dollars of waste to occur…..

The guy was a failure ….it took Bush to long to relieve him from office…..and Obama to clean the mess up…..

Bush simply never got to this point…conceptually and ideologically….

Anyways…

The President and Commander-in-Chief will discuss possibility reaching out to the Taliban leadership that is still alive for peace negotiations….

Here’s something on the move which was used wholesale in Iraq with good success….

President Obama met with his war cabinet on Friday, and the issue of reconciling with the Taliban is gaining traction, even as administration officials debate whether the time is right.

A senior administration official pointed to recent successes by American and Pakistani forces in capturing and interrogating senior Taliban leaders in Pakistan. In addition, administration officials have sought to maintain a full-court press to persuade their Pakistani counterparts to keep attacking Taliban operatives, the official said.

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, Gen. James L. Jones, the national security adviser, and Adm.Michael Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, have all traveled to the region recently to try to keep the pressure on both Afghan and Pakistani officials.

“It is now more a question of ‘when’ than a question of ‘if,’ ” the administration official said, when asked about the idea of reconciliation talks with senior Taliban officials.

Another official, who like the senior administration official spoke on condition of anonymity because internal administration discussions were still at an early stage, said, “There’s been a lot of energy applied to the reconciliation issue in the last few weeks.”

But both officials added that, for now, there are no plans for reaching out soon to high-ranking Taliban leaders. That effort, they said, is likely to wait until after the United States takes on Taliban insurgents in Kandahar in what is expected to be the next major military offensive in Afghanistan.

The effort was also brought up by the British who have troops in country….

Mr. Gates, traveling in Afghanistan this week, said that despite the success of the Marja offensive, it was too early to expect reconciliation with some senior Taliban members, cautioning not to get “too impatient.” He said that Taliban leaders would not be interested until “they see that the likelihood of their being successful has been cast into serious doubt,” adding, “My guess is they’re not at that point yet.”

The momentum behind reconciliation got a major boost this week from Britain, the key American ally in Afghanistan. In a speech in Boston, the British foreign minister, David Miliband, called on President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan to make as concerted an effort to reach out to disaffected Taliban leaders as British and American troops are making to integrate lower-level Taliban soldiers.

“Without a genuine effort to understand and ultimately address the wider concerns which fuel the insurgency,” Mr. Miliband said, “it will be hard to convince significant numbers of combatants that their interests will be better served by working with the government than by fighting against it.”

The issue — brought up by Mr. Obama himself — was discussed during the 90-minute session in the White House on Friday, administration officials said. But no decisions were made. Participants included General Jones, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Admiral Mullen, and Richard C. Holbrooke, the special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan.


March 12, 2010 Posted by | Blogs, Breaking News, Government, Media, Men, Military, Other Things, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Updates | , , , , | 3 Comments

Afghanistan…..First the 'stick'….Then after….. the 'carrot'……

The United States….. feeling that they are taking the war in Afghanistan to the Taliban …and emboldening Pakistan to do the same….. finds itself in position to start thinking about an end game…even as the ‘surge’ troop levels continues to climb…..

The Dog implores everyone to stop and think about this…..

I don’t care what people say…’surges’ work….and their use by Obama has only served to reinforce the fact the then Defense Secretary Rumsfield was a miserably bad director of this country’s first campaign in Iraq…..

By disregarding the ‘Powell Doctrine’of using overwhelming force…. he wasted lives and caused billions of dollars of waste to occur…..

The guy was a failure ….it took Bush to long to relieve him from office…..and Obama to clean the mess up…..

Bush simply never got to this point…conceptually and ideologically….

Anyways…

The President and Commander-in-Chief will discuss possibility reaching out to the Taliban leadership that is still alive for peace negotiations….

Here’s something on the move which was used wholesale in Iraq with good success….

President Obama met with his war cabinet on Friday, and the issue of reconciling with the Taliban is gaining traction, even as administration officials debate whether the time is right.

A senior administration official pointed to recent successes by American and Pakistani forces in capturing and interrogating senior Taliban leaders in Pakistan. In addition, administration officials have sought to maintain a full-court press to persuade their Pakistani counterparts to keep attacking Taliban operatives, the official said.

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, Gen. James L. Jones, the national security adviser, and Adm.Michael Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, have all traveled to the region recently to try to keep the pressure on both Afghan and Pakistani officials.

“It is now more a question of ‘when’ than a question of ‘if,’ ” the administration official said, when asked about the idea of reconciliation talks with senior Taliban officials.

Another official, who like the senior administration official spoke on condition of anonymity because internal administration discussions were still at an early stage, said, “There’s been a lot of energy applied to the reconciliation issue in the last few weeks.”

But both officials added that, for now, there are no plans for reaching out soon to high-ranking Taliban leaders. That effort, they said, is likely to wait until after the United States takes on Taliban insurgents in Kandahar in what is expected to be the next major military offensive in Afghanistan.

The effort was also brought up by the British who have troops in country….

Mr. Gates, traveling in Afghanistan this week, said that despite the success of the Marja offensive, it was too early to expect reconciliation with some senior Taliban members, cautioning not to get “too impatient.” He said that Taliban leaders would not be interested until “they see that the likelihood of their being successful has been cast into serious doubt,” adding, “My guess is they’re not at that point yet.”

The momentum behind reconciliation got a major boost this week from Britain, the key American ally in Afghanistan. In a speech in Boston, the British foreign minister, David Miliband, called on President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan to make as concerted an effort to reach out to disaffected Taliban leaders as British and American troops are making to integrate lower-level Taliban soldiers.

“Without a genuine effort to understand and ultimately address the wider concerns which fuel the insurgency,” Mr. Miliband said, “it will be hard to convince significant numbers of combatants that their interests will be better served by working with the government than by fighting against it.”

The issue — brought up by Mr. Obama himself — was discussed during the 90-minute session in the White House on Friday, administration officials said. But no decisions were made. Participants included General Jones, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Admiral Mullen, and Richard C. Holbrooke, the special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan.


March 12, 2010 Posted by | Blogs, Breaking News, Government, Media, Men, Military, Other Things, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Updates | , , , , | 3 Comments

The War in Afghanistan…on different fronts…….

While the Marines have launched a strong military push and media push into Marja , Afghanista…..the CIA has launched another front in Pakistan and Afghansan……by snatching up the heads of the Taliban operations ……..

The Marines are pushing on after a quiet entrance and fierce fighting for the last couple of days….The CIA capture count is up to three and rising…….

The long-term objective will be to hold the ground retaken and try to keep pace with the replacement leadership that filling the vacuum caused by the snatched leaders…..

But the Taliban have been here before and this is their response…….

The full fury of a U.S. military air-ground task force is being unleashed on a small town in southern Afghanistan. Strike jets, helicopter gunships and armed robot drones directed by airborne and satellite sensors tracking enemy movements, and thousands of heavily armed infantrymen are advancing (with a heavy media presence) behind armored trucks and ground-penetrating radar sweeping for IEDs, while rapid-fire artillery rockets whoosh overhead.

Ever since U.S. combat troops descended on Afghanistan in October 2001, the Taliban fighters have been flaunting their ability to fade away when facing this kind of combat power. It seems childishly petulant even to repeat it: insurgents simply don’t fight big modern armies head-on. They disappear, only to pop up later at a time and place of their own choosing.

Now, just 48 hours after the battle for the southern Afghanistan market town of Marja was launched, military commanders are confirming that many of the Taliban fighters who had made Marja a base of operations had slipped away during the weeks that U.S. forces were loudly preparing the assault and freely broadcasting its location and purpose. A senior officer told me this morning that the Taliban leadership had “bugged out,” leaving behind 100 to 150 fighters with orders to fight and die in place. “And they are,” this officer reported. As in previous battles, the Taliban are fighting from compounds jammed with families, and there have been resultant civilian casualties. Given all this, it was odd to hear a British military spokesman, Maj. Gen. Gordon Messenger, assert that the goal of “surprising the Taliban” seemed to have been met. His evidence: “The Taliban have not been able to put up a coherent response. They appear confused and disorientated.”

The CIA front has been sucessful in two ways…..tracking down and making caputures…and working both governmenets to do so…..

The reported capture of Mullah Abdul Salam follows word of the recent arrest, also in Pakistan, of the Taliban’s No. 2 leader, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, whose influence was described as second only to the movement’s spiritual leader and supreme commander, Mullah Mohammed Omar.

Salam, the shadow governor of Kunduz province in Afghanistan’s north, was arrested earlier this month, according to the officially appointed governor of Kunduz, Mohammed Omar. He said he was informed of the capture by intelligence officials.

“This is a big blow for the Taliban here,” Omar said.

It was not immediately known whether Salam’s arrest was related to that of Baradar, but Taliban shadow governors, who are usually senior commanders, are thought to travel regularly to Pakistan for consultations with the movement’s leadership, known as the Quetta shura.

Omar said he was told that a deputy of Salam’s, Mullah Mohammed, was arrested along with him. Some previous reports have identified Mullah Mohammed as the shadow governor of neighboring Baghlan province.

Taliban shadow governments sprang up across Afghanistan after the movement was driven from power in 2001 by a U.S.-led invasion. By late last year, according to a Western intelligence official, there were shadow governments in all but two of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces.

One would think that these actions are no coincidence coming from the CIA…… after the Taliban attack on the CIA info  center last month ……that resulted in seven of their members being taken out……

February 18, 2010 Posted by | Blogs, Breaking News, Government, Media, Men, Military, PoliticalDog Calls, Politics, Updates | , , , , | 2 Comments