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Arrests of illegal crossers along the Southwest border dropped more than two-thirds from 2000 to 2010…

Border fence

The desert sand east of San Luis, Ariz., is imprinted with Border Patrol tracks in this 2007 photo. New stadium lighting, triple fencing, more border agents and the recession are credited with a plunge in the numbers of illegal crossings in the Southwest since 2000. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)

Last night a commentor lamented the call by this Dog and the President for Immigration reform….

The post was long and criticized ANY let up in illegal immigration enforcement….

That same posted should read this linked piece…

The Illegal immigration problem is fading….

While there will always be illegals….

There really isn’t any reason to keep hiring more Border Patrol people….

Nor is there any reason to build anymore fences or walls….

It seems that a lousy economy has slowed the influx of people better than any wall, border patrol person , or other Government law enforcement tool….

Enough with this more enforcement bullshit…

We need reform of the laws to address the problems in the current system that penalized people who serve this country and can’t get citizenship….

We need a system to not ship out young children that only know America as their country….

And a way to address needs of this country for people who can help it grow and prosper….

Wild foot chases and dust-swirling car pursuits may be the adrenaline-pumping stuff of recruitment efforts, but agents on the U.S.-Mexico border these days have to deal with a more mundane occupational reality: the boredom of guarding a frontier where illegal crossings have dipped to record low levels.

Porous corridors along the 2,000-mile border do remain, mostly in the Tucson area, requiring constant vigilance. But beefed-up enforcement and the job-killing effects of the great recession have combined to reduce the flood of immigrants in many former hot spots to a trickle.

Apprehensions along the Southwest border overall dropped more than two-thirds from 2000 to 2010, from 1.6 million to 448,000, and almost every region has lonely posts where agents sit for hours staring at the barrier, watching the “fence rust” as some put it.

“When the traffic stops … of course it’s going to be difficult for the agents to stay interested,” said Supervisory Agent Ken Quillin, from the agency’s Yuma, Ariz., sector. “I understand guys have a tough time staying awake…. they didn’t join the border patrol to sit on an X,” Quillin added, using the slang term for line watch duty……
More…

Note….

We now need to seperate the fact of this issue from the hyped fiction….

From Politicaldog 101…

April 21, 2011 Posted by | Blogs, Breaking News, Counterpoints, Editorial, Fiction, Government, Law, Media, Politics, The Economy, Travel, Updates, Women | , , | Leave a comment

The ‘virtual fence’ between Mexico and the United States is done….there will be no more work done on it…..

capt1d35d1605e1643e2843.jpg

Napolitano said the freeze on work beyond two pilot projects in Arizona was pending a broader reassessment. But the move signals a likely death knell for a troubled five-year plan to drape a chain of tower-mounted sensors and other surveillance gear across most of the 2,000-mile southern border.

border-fence.jpg

That vision, initiated in 2006 by President George W. Bush, called for a series of networked cameras, radar and communications gear to help speed the response of U.S. Border Patrol officers to catch illegal immigrants and smugglers over the vast border area. However, the effort has been plagued by technical problems and delays with prime contractor Boeing Corp.

Obama officials embraced the program, known as SBInet, on taking office in 2009, setting out a new five-year timetable for completion. However, the administration last month proposed cutting funding to finish SBInet’s first phase by roughly 30 percent to $574 million, under new congressional questioning about the plan’s feasibility.

In a four-sentence statement, Napolitano said the department will immediately redeploy $50 million of stimulus funds to other technology, including mobile surveillance devices, sensors, radios and laptop computers.

“Not only do we have an obligation to secure our borders, we have a responsibility to do so in the most cost-effective way possible,” Napolitano said. “The system of sensors and cameras along the Southwest border known as SBInet has been plagued with cost overruns and missed deadlines.”

In a statement, House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie G. Thompson (D-Miss.) called SBInet “a grave and expensive disappointment.”

The project which was put into effect by President Bush was over cost and not found to be very effective….

DHS has spent $3.4 billion on border fencing in recent years, completing 640 of a planned 652 miles of fencing and vehicle barriers as part of the Secure Border Initiative. Block 1 of SBInet, the technology portion of the plan, was budgeted to spend $700 million to erect about 50 camera and radio towers on a 28-mile segment south of Tucson and a 30-mile stretch near Ajo, Ariz.

Last year, DHS officials predicted SBInet would cost $6.7 billion to secure the full border, minus a 200-mile span in southwestern Texas that is difficult to cross and expensive to monitor.

The Government Accountability Office, Congress’s audit arm, has found the government rushed to use off-the-shelf equipment without adequate testing. Boeing initially relied on police dispatching software that was not able to process the vast flow of information streaming from the desert, and other technical problems plagued cameras and radar.

SBInet is the federal government’s third attempt to secure the border with technology. Between 1998 and 2005, it spent $429 million on earlier surveillance initiatives that were so unreliable that only 1 percent of alarms led to arrests.

Analysts say technology remains a vital component of efforts to secure the border, a goal that includes combating terrorism, organized crime, drug cartels and illegal immigration. Tightened border security has also been viewed as a prerequisite for winning Senate approval of legislation that would extend legal status to some of an estimated 10.8 million illegal immigrants in the United States.

Federal officials have said their goal was to enable the Border Patrol to detect 70 to 85 percent of incursions with as few as 22,000 to 25,000 officers. The agency has doubled in size over the past decade, to 20,000 officers.

The news will play well for Obama for a very short while …..

But the Bush project was a waste of money …but good political theatre for the right……

The Border patrol numbers are right behind the New York City Police Deapartmenet as the second largest law-eforcemenet agency in the country…….

March 17, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Crime, Government, Law, Media, Men, Other Things, Politics, Travel, Updates | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The 'virtual fence' between Mexico and the United States is done….there will be no more work done on it…..

capt1d35d1605e1643e2843.jpg

Napolitano said the freeze on work beyond two pilot projects in Arizona was pending a broader reassessment. But the move signals a likely death knell for a troubled five-year plan to drape a chain of tower-mounted sensors and other surveillance gear across most of the 2,000-mile southern border.

border-fence.jpg

That vision, initiated in 2006 by President George W. Bush, called for a series of networked cameras, radar and communications gear to help speed the response of U.S. Border Patrol officers to catch illegal immigrants and smugglers over the vast border area. However, the effort has been plagued by technical problems and delays with prime contractor Boeing Corp.

Obama officials embraced the program, known as SBInet, on taking office in 2009, setting out a new five-year timetable for completion. However, the administration last month proposed cutting funding to finish SBInet’s first phase by roughly 30 percent to $574 million, under new congressional questioning about the plan’s feasibility.

In a four-sentence statement, Napolitano said the department will immediately redeploy $50 million of stimulus funds to other technology, including mobile surveillance devices, sensors, radios and laptop computers.

“Not only do we have an obligation to secure our borders, we have a responsibility to do so in the most cost-effective way possible,” Napolitano said. “The system of sensors and cameras along the Southwest border known as SBInet has been plagued with cost overruns and missed deadlines.”

In a statement, House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie G. Thompson (D-Miss.) called SBInet “a grave and expensive disappointment.”

The project which was put into effect by President Bush was over cost and not found to be very effective….

DHS has spent $3.4 billion on border fencing in recent years, completing 640 of a planned 652 miles of fencing and vehicle barriers as part of the Secure Border Initiative. Block 1 of SBInet, the technology portion of the plan, was budgeted to spend $700 million to erect about 50 camera and radio towers on a 28-mile segment south of Tucson and a 30-mile stretch near Ajo, Ariz.

Last year, DHS officials predicted SBInet would cost $6.7 billion to secure the full border, minus a 200-mile span in southwestern Texas that is difficult to cross and expensive to monitor.

The Government Accountability Office, Congress’s audit arm, has found the government rushed to use off-the-shelf equipment without adequate testing. Boeing initially relied on police dispatching software that was not able to process the vast flow of information streaming from the desert, and other technical problems plagued cameras and radar.

SBInet is the federal government’s third attempt to secure the border with technology. Between 1998 and 2005, it spent $429 million on earlier surveillance initiatives that were so unreliable that only 1 percent of alarms led to arrests.

Analysts say technology remains a vital component of efforts to secure the border, a goal that includes combating terrorism, organized crime, drug cartels and illegal immigration. Tightened border security has also been viewed as a prerequisite for winning Senate approval of legislation that would extend legal status to some of an estimated 10.8 million illegal immigrants in the United States.

Federal officials have said their goal was to enable the Border Patrol to detect 70 to 85 percent of incursions with as few as 22,000 to 25,000 officers. The agency has doubled in size over the past decade, to 20,000 officers.

The news will play well for Obama for a very short while …..

But the Bush project was a waste of money …but good political theatre for the right……

The Border patrol numbers are right behind the New York City Police Deapartmenet as the second largest law-eforcemenet agency in the country…….

March 17, 2010 Posted by | Breaking News, Crime, Government, Law, Media, Men, Other Things, Politics, Travel, Updates | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Arrests at the United States southern Border drop by 23%…drug seizures rise…….

Because of stronger enforcement, and the weaker economy, lessening the need for labor …the Homeland Security Department reports that border apprehensions have dropped to 556,041 from 723,825 in the last 12 months from Sept 30th……the US Border Patrol has expanded it agents from roughly 11,000 to 20,000, making it the second largest uniformed law enforcement agency in the U.S. behind the New York City Police Department ( 31,000 )…..

Drug seizures have increased though…..with port finds up 53% on cocaine, 13% on marijuana…on land the marijuana finds are up 37% and cocaine is up 15% from last year…..

People try to ship drugs over and under water, in the air and in vehicles and by foot…..

 

November 9, 2009 Posted by | Crime, Government, Law, Military, Politics, The Economy | , , , , , , | 2 Comments